MAC/20: Mines and Communities

Latin America Update

Published by MAC on 2007-07-20


Latin America Update - Exigen nueva Ley de Minería para Honduras: enfrentamiento dejó como resultado 71 detenidos y 12 heridos

20th July 2007

In Honduras, at least 12 people were injured and 72 arrested when police violently cleared several roadblocks set up by protesters demanding a new mining law.

In neighbouring Guatemala, citizens of Santa Cruz Barillas, Huehuetenango, reiterated their rejection of mining and asked the authorities to respect the result of a community consultation on the issue. Over 15 community consultations of this kind have taken place in Guatemala since 2005.

The Famatina mountain range in the province of La Rioja, Argentina, was the site of the fourth national gathering of the Union of Citizen Assemblies (UAC). The weekend included a 'caravan' to Peñas Negras, where citizens blocked Barrick Gold's exploration actvities for four months. The third day of the gathering was dedicated to a 'citizens'' International Tribunal against the company. Activists from Chile, USA and Argentina, armed with testimonies from communities around the world, acted as witnesses and provided documentation of Barrick's activities to a panel of judges composed of respected local leaders. Barrick was finally found guilty of "irreparable damages" and environmental and social genocide

The world's number one gold company was also targeted by protestors in Chile this week, as the Canadian Prime Minister gave time to Barrick Gold on his visit to Santiago, rather than to affected communities. Harper said that as far as he knows Barrick "follows Canadian standards of corporate social responsibility." However, thanks to public protests the PM had to enter and exit Barrick's offices through the backdoor under high security.

In the province of Carabya, Puno, in the Southeast of Perú, over a hundred sites of ancient petroglyphs and rock art of high historical and artistic value are in imminent danger of being destroyed by mining activities. Local communities in Colombia have also expressed concern over prospecting for coal in an environmentally fragile area


BOLIVIA

Bolivia signs major iron ore deal

19th July 2007

http://english.aljazeera.net

India's Jindal Steel and Power and Bolivia's state-run Empresa Siderurgica Mutun have signed an agreement to exploit one of the richest iron ore deposits in the world in southeastern Bolivia. The deposits are located on Mt. El Muntun, 27km from Puerto Suarez, near the border with Brazil. It is estimated to hold 40 billion tons of iron and 10 billion tons of magnesium.

The project is expected to create as many as 21,000 jobs and net around $200 million in yearly tax revenues. The agreement calls for a $1.5-billion investment by Jindal in the first five years, followed by $2.1 billion during the estimated 40 years it will take before the mine is exhausted. "I know its Bolivia's biggest project and I want to see that it is carried out well," said Vikrant Gujral, Jindal Steel vice president.

"The work is done. We've waited more than 50 years for this," said Evo Morales, Bolivian president, who was present at the signing ceremony in eastern Santa Cruz city along with Gujral and Walter Chavez, Empresa Siderurgica president. The joint agreement resulted from what Morales called "very tough" negotiations that began in June 2006.


GUATEMALA

Demanding rural development without mining - The people of Santa Cruz de Barillas speak out

By Alberto Ramírez, http://www.prensalibre.com

19th July 2007

Guatemala - Citizens of Santa Cruz Barillas, Huehuetenango, reiterated their rejection of metal mining and asked authorities to respect the result of the community consultation.

Rubén Herrera, the president of Coordination of the Consultation, stated that the results of the vote, in which 46,490 people took part in were nine votes in favour of mining and 46,481 against. The community consultation took place on June 23, 2007, and the results were delivered to the Congress and other federal institutions yesterday.

Herrera explained that Huehuetenango is the province with the most coffee exports and the highest level of remittances, and thus they don't need mining but a rural and integral development plan to improve the conditions of the communities. Hermelinda Simón, a citizen of the municipality, said that she is worried about losing water in
her community.

Community Development

Luis Fernando Pérez, president of the Congressional Energy Commission, explained that the important thing is that there be community development, and not just corporate benefit. Pérez added that their working group is looking at reforming the Mining Law.

Carlos Salvatierra, from MadreSelva, asserted that more people participate in the community consultations than in the elections for public office, because they are scared of losing their natural resources.

LINKS:

Photo-essay about community consultations in Guatemala:
http://mimundo-jamesrodriguez.blogspot.com/2007/06/sipakapas-legacy.html

Turning Down a Gold Mine
By Dawn Paley
Published: February 7, 2007
http://thetyee.ca/News/2007/02/07/MarlinProject/


HONDURAS

Protest against Open Pit Mining: 12 injured and 72 arrested

TEGUCIGALPA.— At least 12 people were injured and 59 arrested Tuesday when Honduran police violently cleared several roadblocks set up by protesters demanding a new mining law, reported ACAN-EFE.

Salvador Zuniga, consultant of the Coordinating Board of Peasant and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras, told AFP, "They came at us wielding clubs; we have several injured and 10 arrested." The group had led the protest at a roadblock 120 kilometers north of the capital.

The demonstrators are demanding a law that forbids open pit mining, including the use of cyanide, mercury and other toxic substances.

They also call for community meetings so the people can decide if they want the mining operations or not, and to obligate the companies to carry out measures to mitigate the impact on the environment, among other demands.


BRIEF REPORT REGARDING THE INCIDENTS THAT OCCURRED IN THE DEMONSTRATIONS FOR A NEW MINING LAW IN HONDURAS

CIVIC ALLIANCE FOR DEMOCRACY (ACD)

Yesterday, July 17, thousands of people gathered in different geographic locations around Honduras to take part in peaceful demonstrations for the ratification of a new Mining Law that looks out for the benefit of people and communities, and not simply reforms that leave many voids that favour the transnational mining companies.

Demonstrations took place in the following places: San Marcos, Ocotepeque; Santa Rosa de Copan, Copan; Colonia 6 de Mayo & La Flecha, Santa Barbara; Siguatepeque, Comayagua; Catacamas, Olancho; the central park in San Pedro Sula, Cortes; the Municipal Office of Danli, El Paraiso; and below the National Congress building in the Honduran capital, Tegucigalpa. Unfortunately, in the 6 de Mayo neighbourhood and in Siguatepeque, the situation changed unexpectedly when national police agents used aggression and force against the protestors. Repression included beatings, tear gas, high pressure water, and, more seriously, the use of guns, leaving dozens of people wounded and/or detained. Furthermore, police confiscated photographic and video cameras used to capture images of the abuse of authority.

In the end, the incidents left approximately 59 people arrested, 1 police agent and 17 protestors wounded. Among the latter are: Geovany López (16), Lucio López (46), Eliseo Mejia (25) Lázaro Ardon (55), (face disfigured), Freddy López (16) Antonio Sánchez (60) Giovanni Mejia (18), Cruz Aguirre (62) Dionisio Calderón (47) Eliseo Quintanilla (20) Jesús Bautista (52), Francisco López (50) Trinidad Perdomo (20), Julio Cuellar (49), Gunshot wounds: Elder Carranza (20), critical condition; Anael Antonio Henríquez (27) and a 65-year-old elder whose whereabouts are unknown.

We hereby publicly refute the declarations by Departmental Chief of the Preventive Police, Silvio Edmundo Inestroza, who claimed that Elder Carranza is a member of that institution. This is false; the youth in question is a humble farmer who participated in the demonstrations. The incidents described above demonstrate the little tolerance of repressive State entities towards the citizens who peacefully demanded a new Mining Law. As always, the justification of the police is that the protestors were armed and wounded each other, further suggesting that it was the demonstrators who began the violent acts. It is worth pointing out that at the moment of the police attack, the protestors were praying. Under attack, people simply sought to defend themselves and to seek refuge in nearby houses, from which they were violently removed.

At the same time, the Negotiations Commission – comprised of Bishop Luis Alfonso Santos, Purificacion Hernandez, Father Rudy Mejia, Francisco Machado, Martin Erazo, Roger Escober and Pedro Rodolfo Arteaga – began meetings with the Commission from the Executive branch that prepared the Mining Law proposal, led by Nelson Avila, Presidential Advisor on Economic Matters. The group then traveled to the National Congress to meet with: the entire congressional dictamen commission led by Arnoldo Avilez; members of Caritas and Auxiliary Bishop Juan Jose Pineda Fasquelle; representatives of the Secretariat of Natural Resources and the Environment, including Minister Mayra Mejia; representatives of the governmental mining directorate DEFOMIN, led by Director Roberto Elvir; and representatives of the Non-Metallic Mining Association, among others. At this meeting, the central aspects of the Civic Alliance for Democracy's demands were incorporated. Furthermore, this preliminary agreement is conditional on an exhaustive revision of the entire text of the Law, while the Mining Commission committed to respecting the incorporated apsects as well as new contributions.

Following these advances, a meeting took place with part of the Directives of the National Congress, headed by Congress President Roberto Micheletti Bain and Secretary Jose Alfredo Saavedra. Dictamen commission representatives Arnoldo Avilez and Ramon Velasquez Nazar were also present. Congress President Micheletti ratified the agreements and promised to invite representatives of the Civic Alliance to the discussion of the law in the Congress, scheduled to begin on August 14th. Micheletti requested theseal and leave of Bishop Luis Alfonso Santos, whosealed his commitment with a closing prayer.


ARGENTINA

Argentina Popular Tribunal Convicts Barrick Gold

Gold Mining Giant Sentenced to Expulsion from Latin America

El Independiente Newspaper

13th July 2007

La Rioja - The Famatina mountain range in the province of La Rioja, Argentina was the site of the fourth national gathering of the Union of Citizen Assemblies (UAC) the weekend of 6-8 July, 2007. Members of community assemblies throughout Argentina, Chile, Uruguay and Paraguay fighting against the effects of transnational extractive industries met to share strategies and information in their common struggles. Some two hundred individuals gathered, representing neighbouring assemblies resisting a host of extractive industries: the insertion of open-pit metal mining operations throughout the Andes; paper mill industries in the Uruguay river basin; transnational forestry operations; communities displaced by hydroelectric dam projects; cross-state contamination by transnational industries; and the expansion of GMO soy agroindustry. The similarities in their common struggles were clear to participants: The issue of the protection of water resources, the preservation of social and ecological biodiversity, the fight against contamination and the plunder of natural resources, as well as the rights of communities to carry out their own informed decisions regarding appropriate local development.

Argentina, like much of Latin America, is the focus of new and highly aggressive insertion by multinational corporations, who, with the complicity of the neoliberal government, intend to reshape the infrastructure of the country, in order to plunder mineral, water, agricultural and other natural riches, and leave behind contamination and poverty. Communities find themselves confronting a growing host of actors, from global institutions such as the World Bank, multinational corporations, NGOs, public and private armed forces, media outlets, with national political leaders dedicated to facilitate this process of globalization at the expense of ecological systems, human well-being and national sovereignty. These struggles against contamination and extractive industries are taking place within a context of a deliberate strategy of economic, social and cultural abandonment by the State, creating a false "jobs vs. nature" dichotomy.

Resistance by community groups across Argentina is increasingly organized in a horizontal, democratic form of community "assemblies." Distrustful of politicians, citizens are taking upon themselves the task of halting, by whatever means available, the installation of these projects. Direct action, such as road blockages and demonstrations, combine with community education and the use of legal and political maneuvers to interfere with and halt corporate insertion, as communities claim and defend spaces for autonomous community institutions, indigenous rights, local development and food sovereignty.

The importance of the Famatina Range for this UAC meeting was not lost upon participants: Barrick Gold Corporation, the world's largest gold mining firm, was recently forced out of the province of La Rioja after a stunning series of events culminated in the regional prohibition of open-pit mining and the ejection of a corrupt pro-mining governor. Community members in Famatina are warily declaring a no-compromise victory against the gold mining giant, and they are not resting, instead reaching across provincial and national borders to offer their example and experiences to other communities. Thus, an important part of the weekend was a caravan to Peñas Negras, the site where citizens blocked, for four months standing, Barrick Gold from access to their exploration activities upon the Famatina Range. Local activists spoke of the intrinsic value of the mountain range, essential to all forms of life and society in the region, threatened by mining activities. Their decision to take an active, no-compromise strategy in defense of the mountain is exemplified in their motto "Famatina Cannot Not Be Touched."

In two days of meetings and discussions, participants expanded contacts and strategies, and set out goals, including a national Day of Action to be carried out August 10. The strategy of "no-compromise" in halting extractive industry insertion is strong: In municipalities and in provinces, citizen assemblies are demanding and winning prohibitions of open-pit mining with toxic chemicals, prohibiting mining exploration as well as operations, as metals mining is incompatible with sustainable development. Participants reaffirmed their commitment to struggle to expel Barrick Gold from the reviled Veladero/Pascua-Lama project upon the Chile-Argentina border among the glaciers of the Andes.

The third day of the gathering was dedicated to an International Tribunal Against Barrick Gold Corporation. Activists from Chile, USA and Argentina, armed with testimonies from communities around the world impacted by Barrick Gold took the stage, providing witnesses and documentation of the "genocidal" practices of Barrick, to a panel of judges composed of respected local leaders. Argentine journalist and activist Javier Rodriguez Pardo acted as the prosecutor, offering hard-hitting and eloquent indictment of the sordid practices which have continued since the company's inception. Amply demonstrated were the disastrous environmental, economic and human rights consequences of Barrick Gold's practices. Barrick's Pascua Lama and Veladero projects, as well as their exploration activities in Famatina were meticulously exposed by a parade of expert witnesses, scientists and affected communities.

The job of defending Barrick Gold before the Tribunal was handed to David Modersbach, a North American anti-mining activist studying in Argentina. In defense of the company, he pointed to the "real" criminals, the Argentine politicians and officials who have transformed the legal codes and facilitate the handover of national resources and sovereignty to some eighty multinational mining firms including Barrick Gold, in effect "legalizing" Barrick's contamination and plunder. In his role as a Barrick "lawyer," he also attempted to bribe key witnesses and judges.

The trial ended with a forceful verdict against the gold mining giant: Barrick was found guilty of "irreparable damages" and environmental and social genocide, and condemned by the Tribunal to expulsion from Latin America, Southeast Asia, and the native lands in Canada and United States and Australia where the mining firm operates. Barrick was ordered to make pay compensation for all damages and human rights violations which they have committed. The Tribunal also directed civil society to identify and bring to justice the Argentine public officials complicit in the plunder and contamination of their own country.

Some of the Parcipating Groups:
Coordination of Citizen Assemblies for the Life of Chilecito (La Rioja)
Self-Organized Neighbors of Famatina, Miranda, Pituil, Chañarmuyo y Capital (La Rioja)
Cabinet of Crisis (Córdoba University)
Popular Commission for the Recuperation of Water (Córdoba)
Environmental Movement of Termas de Río Hondo (Santiago del Estero)
Assembly Concorvida (Entre Ríos)
Citizens Assembly of Uruguay
Mothers of Jáchal (San Juan)
Self-Organized Neighbors of Gualeguaychú (Entre Ríos), General Alvear (Mendoza), Ongamira (Córdoba), Andalgalá (Catamarca), del Valle Calchaquí (Tucumán), de Sierra de la Ventana (Buenos Aires), Esquel (Chubut)
Grupo Quillamapu, University of Buenos Aires
FOCUS on Human Rights (Buenos Aires)
University of General Sarmiento and Clacso (Buenos Aires)
National Institute of Industrial Technology (INTI, Buenos Aires)
Binational Assembly of Affected Persons by Yacyretá (Misiones-Paraguay)
Group PROECO and NOA (Tucumán)
Gathering for Biodiversity Against the Soy Industry (Rosario)
Latin American Geopolitical Observatory (Buenos Aires)
Association of Independent Wine Producers of San Juan
Uranium, No Thank You (Mendoza)
Group CTD Anibal Verón (La Plata)
Campesino Movement of Córdoba
Corpwatch (USA)
RENACE (Santa Fe)
Profesors and Students of UNC, UCC, UBA, LA PLATA, MENDOZA.
Self-Organized Neighbors of Chile – No to Pascua-Lama (Luis Faura)

For More Information:

www.protestbarrick,net
www.ciudadanosporlavida.com.ar
www.noalamina.org
www.noalapascualama.org
www.yacyreta.info


COLOMBIA

Careful with the Páramos!

Editorial El TIEMPO Newspaper - www.eltiempo.com

13th July 2007

Colombia - The fifty days of operations of Geoperforaciones, a company contracted by the mining firm Acerías Paz de Río to analyze coal deposits, ended up being very costly for the high mountain páramo of Rabanal, located between Boyacá and Cundinamarca in Colombia.

A 350 meter deep well was drilled, some 25,000 frailejón (a species of rose) plants were destroyed, a road cut through the heart of the wetlands, and dams and diversions were constructed in creeks from which originate the water supplies of the 300,000 people of eight municipalities who live below. In the words of Corpoboyacá, "very serious damages were caused in 10,000 square meters of the wetlands, with damages against a species of frailejón in danger of extinction."

Many of the specimens destroyed were over 200 years old. This is just an example, as recently reported in this newspaper, of how little our páramos matter to some people. The páramos are a unique and extremely fragile system of high mountain wetlands, found only in Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Peru. They are a vital source of water, serve as carbon sinks and support endemic biodiversity, as well as being essential spaces for the development of indigenous and campesino cultures in the Andes. They compromise ecosystems which are very vulnerable and seriously threatened by climate change and livestock and extractive industries.

Because of its importance, the Rabanal páramo has been selected as one of the pilot sites for Colombia in the Andean Páramo Project, financed by the Global Environmental Fund, with the goal of protecting this valuable ecosystem. The waters which emerge from these wetlands support almost one hundred aqueducts and several reservoirs and lakes which provide water for some 180,000 persons and irrigate more than a million hectares. The Acerías project is destined to be the first extractive intervention. In 2001 the company reported carrying out 44 coal explorations with various constructions. According to the Ministry of Mines, there are 22 claims filed for the extraction of coal and one for construction materials in the area. We will have to wait and see what the environmental impact of mining colonization will be.

Unfortunately, what happened to Rabanal is not the exception. Many other páramos are threatened by gold, coal, lime and gravel operations, as well as livestock and other inappropriate uses of these systems. Colombia has over a million hectares of páramo. By the end of 2005, some 311,000 of them were covered with mining concessions, and 62,000 had active mining concessions awarded. The threat looming over the páramos is very high.

A confusing section of the Mining Code of 2001 describing areas protected from mining is serving to award mining titles in highly environmentally sensitive areas. This is taking place despite conditions put forth by Constitutional Courts, which interpret this article saying "the decision should be necessarily inclined towards the protection of the environment, as if mining activities are carried out and later found to cause serious damages, it will be impossible to correct the consequences" (Sentence C-339 of 2002).

This is exactly what happened in Rabanal. Who is now going to replace the frailejones? The solution is obvious: Aside from imposing a fine as an example to those responsible for the damages produced, the reformulation of the necessary articles in the Mining Code is necessary, to put into highlight the most important objective: The defense and preservation of the páramos.


PERU

The New Owners of Peru

La Republica

1st July 2007

By Pedro Francke, Professor of the Department of Economy, PUCP

There are seven executives in Peru who earn more than a million soles annually. There are found primarily in the mining sector, according to the consulting firm Deloitte. The highest salary of a manager in Peru is one million four hundred thousand soles annually; about 120,000 soles monthly. I try to imagine what I would do if I earned 120,000 soles every month, year after year. Would I buy and furnish a new apartment every month? With 120,000 soles I could do that. Or better yet, save and buy myself a house every three months? But what would I do with so many houses? Would I spend my money in yachts, private beaches for me alone, servants? In what could someone spend 120,000 soles EVERY month of the year?

It appears that the mining managers earn a whole lot of money. If we compare them to what the mine workers of Casapalca earn, there is no doubt: One mining executive earns more than 200 workers combined.

But if the earnings of managers appears to be a lot, look at what the owners of the companies earn. The owners of the "type C" shares of Southern Peru Copper Corporation have seen their stock rise in price from $10 billion dollars a year ago to some $27 billion dollars today: A profit of $17 billion dollars, over 50 billion soles. This figure definitely escapes my imagination. I don't know how to calculate how many briefcases full of bills would be necessary to hold all this money. How many workers would it be?

What this group has earned with their investment, in just this one company, in just the past year, is more than was earned by all workers in Peru, in all sectors and companies, in the past year. The average worker Peru earned 980 soles monthly. If we combine all of the salaries of the million Peruvian workers, month to month, for a year, we wouldn't reach the sum of what this small group of investors of Southern have earned.

Well, happily, think our readers, the State receives part of these earnings through taxes. In this way, then, all of we Peruvians gain something. WRONG. Whoever thinks this is making a mistake. Peruvian law establishes that those who have shares and gain profits when their value rises does not have to pay taxes on their profits. You and I, workers, every time we cash our monthly paycheck, taxes are already taken out. But for the profits earned in the stock market, nothing is paid, not a sol, zero, nothing.

Southern is one of the three largest mining companies of Peru, and along with Antamina and Yanacocha, make up the half of all of the national mining production, but we can't offer similar figures for the other two, because they do not operate on the stock market. However, we do know that Antamina saw its income rise some $2.5 billion annually solely by the rising prices of copper in international markets: Money which has rained down from heavens, a happy lottery.

In the end, the world is like that: Everyone dances with their own luck. We get what God wills us, what St. Peter blesses us with. Oops, other error... It turns out that the minerals which produce these riches are found in Peruvian territory. According to our Constitution, they belong to the Nation. The winning lottery ticket isn't theirs. These riches weren't given by God to them, they are for all us Peruvians. But if we hold the winning ticket, then why aren't we getting our share of the winnings?


Ancient petroglyphs and rock art in imminent danger, department of Puno, Peru

Lima

16th July 2007

To Mr. President of the Regional Government of Puno
Mr. Minster of Mining and Energy
Ms. Director of the National Institute of Culture

In the Southeast of Perú, over a hundred sites of ancient petroglyphs and rock art of high historical and artistic value are found in the districts of Macusani and Corani in the province of Carabya, in the department of Puno. These pieces of rock art constitute part of our natural heritage and extraordinary beauty. The campesino communities where the majority of these sites are located, call them Tantamaco and Isivilla.

The large concentration of these sites and their varied scenes showing the hunting of camelids, representations of humans and the use of different techniques of hunting and capturing of animals, as well as the extensive range of colors used in the paintings and the location of these sites at a high elevation (up to 4,600 meters), make them an important part of the heritage not only of Peruvians but of all humanity.

However, these sites are in imminent danger of being destroyed by mining activities. In the year 2005, several Canadian companies have begun prospecting activities in the region. The two largest companies are Frontier Pacific and Vena Resources, which have formed consortiums with smaller companies. Their exploration rights cover almost the entire territory of the two campesino communities in the districts of Macusani and Corani and with them, a large majority (90%) of the rock art sites in the region.

This situation has caused the World Monument Fund to consider these sites as one of the most threatened in the world in their most recent biannual list. It should be taken into account that the area comprised by the districts Macusani and Corani, an area of cultural heritage and spectacular natural landscapes, is in itself a historical heritage and permanent economic resource, which should foster tourism and environmental functions and generate throughout time greater economic benefits than short-term mining projects.

This is why we are seeking the protection and defense of such an important historical legacy in its status as Cultural Heritage of Peru, belonging to the Peruvian state. Its destruction would constitute a serious attack against our cultural patrimony.

* Signs on the spanish version...


Peru: Interreligious Delegation Reports Environmental Problems to the US

19th July 2007

http://filer.livinginperu.com/news/img/smelter.jpg500375

(LIP-ir) -- Doe Run Peru, a mining and metals company with its operations in Peru's central Andes, has unceasingly been criticized for its smelting and refining processes at the La Oroya complex in La Oroya, Peru. A group of religious leaders from the Catholic, Lutheran and Evangelist Churches came together in a meeting in La Oroya, located in Junin, to encourage a speedy solution to the contamination the company is allegedly causing. Huancayo's Archbishop, Monsignor Pedro Barreto, Evangelist Pastor Rafael Goto and Lutheran Pastor Pedro Bullón reported to La Oroya's townspeople the efforts being made in the United States and in Peru to find a solution to the problem.

The interreligious group spoke to the President of Doe Run Peru, Juan Carlos Huyhua before going on a media campaign, involving several means of communication in the United States. The Los Angeles Times, The Jewish Daily Forward, the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), KMOV Missouri TV and The Nation magazine are just some of the organizations involved in the campaign to alert the American public as to what is going on in La Oroya, Peru

Attempts have also been made by the interreligious committee to meet with Ira Rennert, self-made billionaire and owner of Renco, the Doe Run Company and Doe Run Peru. These attempts to met with Doe Run president Bruce Neil have been futile.


CHILE

PRESS RELEASE – For Immediate Release

16th July 2007

Canadian Prime Minister's Controversial visit to Santiago: Time for Barrick Gold, but not for communities

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is visiting Chile to mark the tenth anniversary of the Free Trade Agreement between the two nations. Representatives from Chilean civil society asked the Canadian embassy in Chile to facilitate a visit between the Prime Minister and communities affected by Canadian mining companies. Their request has been denied.

According to Joan Kuyek, National Coordinator of MiningWatch Canada, "Stephen Harper is showing the citizens of the Americas that he has a biased, corporate agenda. His stop in Santiago includes a meeting with Barrick Gold, but not with the citizens who are affected by Barrick's operations."

The lack of concern on the part of the Prime Minister about the negative effects caused by Canadian mining investments is especially disheartening given that the recent Roundtable process undertaken by the Canadian government led to an unprecedented agreement by Canadian civil society and industry that government support should be withheld from companies that do not respect international social, environmental and human rights principles. A few short weeks ago, on the occasion of the G8 Summit, Prime Minister Harper stressed the importance of the Roundtable process and its findings.

Lucio Cuenca, from the Latin American Observatory on Environmental Conflicts (OCLA) states that: "It is inappropriate that the Prime Minister meet with and give his support to the company at a time when the Chilean Congress is considering whether to investigate suspected irregularities in the Pascua Lama Project, the State Defence Council of Chile is contemplating suing Barrick for the destruction of glaciers, and a complaint regarding the project that was submitted before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights is pending."

We demand that the Canadian government cease promoting and supporting Canadian companies in the current circumstances.

For more information, go to: www.miningwatch.ca or www.olca.cl/oca/index.htm

Contacts:
Joan Kuyek, MiningWatch Canada
joan@miningwatch.ca

Dawn Paley, MiningWatch Canada
dawn@miningwatch.ca

Lucio Cuenca, OLCA
l.cuenca@olca.cl


Protesters say 'Harper go home' on PM's last day in Chile

CBC News

18th July 2007

http://www.cbc.ca

Prime Minister Stephen Harper was greeted with "Harper go home" and "Canada: What's HARPERing here?" signs on Wednesday morning as he spent his last day in Chile visiting a controversial Canadian mining company. Dozens of protesters waited outside Barrick Gold's Santiago headquarters for Harper's visit, which one Chilean environmental activist called "inappropriate." The protesters claim the company's gold and silver Pascua Lama Project in the Andes Mountains is displacing indigenous people, polluting rivers and damaging three glaciers — charges the company denies.

Harper said Tuesday that as far as he knows Barrick "follows Canadian standards of corporate social responsibility." He said that it was up to Chile and Argentina to determine whether the company was meeting environmental protection standards.

Karyn Keenan, program officer for the Halifax Initiative, an environmental coalition, said that the organization was worried Harper had not been properly informed of the issues surrounding the project. "We're also concerned that Prime Minister Harper's visit to the Barrick offices might be viewed as a gesture of support for the project, just when the Chilean congress is considering forming a special investigatory commission to evaluate alleged irregularities with the approval process for the mine," Keenan, said.

Lucio Cuenca, national co-ordinator of the Latin American Observatory on Environmental Conflicts, agreed with Keenan, claiming the visit implies "tacit approval" of the project on the part of the prime minister. Cuenca says the local defence council is considering suing Barrick for the alleged destruction of the glaciers. He adds that a human rights complaint has been lodged with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

Accusations being studied

A committee of lawmakers from Chile's chamber of deputies is studying the accusations.

One 2002 environmental report by the General Water Directorship estimates the three glaciers have shrunk by 50 to 70 per cent, allegedly as a result of work done during Barrick's exploratory phase, such as road building. Runoff from the glaciers fuels watersheds in the area, supplying water to many communities.

"There's a shortage of water in the summertime, and it's only sustained because of the glaciers," one protester told CBC News. "Because of the destruction of the glaciers, there won't be water in the short-term, there won't be water for the communities." Barrick says the glaciers are melting due to global warming. The company's local director of corporate affairs, Rodrigo Jimenez, says the protesters represented "a small minority."

"A lot of them, as a result of professional activism … unfortunately oppose any type of development — whether it's mining, gas or any type of project around the world," he said. Harper was scheduled to leave Chile Wednesday for Bridgetown, Barbados.


Citizens protest the meeting of Canadian Prime Minister and Barrick - Canadian Prime Minister enters Barrick’s Offices through the Back Door

Santiago

18th July 2007

www.olca.cl

Two hours late and in the presence of a huge security presence that included guards, police and special forces, Stephen Harper arrived at the offices of Barrick Gold and entered through the parking area, in order to avoid the peoples’ protest that started at 8:00 am at the entrance to the building.

Stephen Harper, the Prime Minister of Canada, continues creating controversy in his visit to our country. After refusing to visit with communities affected by large Canadian mining companies in Chile, he declared yesterday “Barrick is following Canadian norms in terms of Corporate Social Responsibility, and will follow all of the rules with regards to the project.” Today, when he visited the offices of Barrick, he had to enter through the backdoor to avoid the chants and yells that revealed that the company is not complying with the promised standards.

Canadian organizations have assured us that these declarations are a ruse, because corporate social responsibility standards have yet to be defined. In other words, they don’t exist.

Harper stayed in the office for about half an hour, while representatives of the communities read a declaration that they later tried to hand deliver to Harper. Harper didn’t receive it, but the company did, and promised to pass it to the highest Canadian authority.

It was a surprise for all of us that an official visitor in our country had to enter and exit through the backdoor, against traffic, and with a security effort that seemed more suited to guarding a dangerous delinquent than to the care of a state official.


Declaration delivered during the demonstration and received by Barrick to give to the Prime Minister

Santiago, July 18, 2007
PUBLIC DECLARATION

Prime Minister of Canada supports Barrick Gold and refuses audience with Communities affected by Pascua Lama

We declare:

It is abhorrent that Stephen Harper, under the pretext of a state visit, intervenes openly and shamelessly on behalf of a mining company whose operations are questionable environmentally, legally, ethically and socially.

It is inconceivable that the maximum authority in a country like Canada, that promotes and supports foreign mining investments at a state level (with the money of all Canadians), shows a total lack of consideration for the effects that these investments generate in communities where mining projects are developed.

We find it worrying that Steven Harper’s agenda includes meetings with the president and with Barrick Gold, the mining company in question, while failing to listen to the voices of citizens accusing murder and destruction ten years after the FTA between the two countries. It demonstrates the double standards of the Prime Minister, who opened public Roundtables on corporate social responsibility in his own country, while here in Chile he refuses to meet with civil society.

We reject the political pressure suggested by this visit, which comes at the same moment at which Barrick is encountering serious difficulties: on June 21, the opening of mine areas was delayed for the fourth time, in mid July the Inter American Commission for Human Rights will determine whether or not they receive for processing the territorial usurpation dispute put forward by the Diaguita community of Huascoaltinos. Three weeks ago the congress showed their concern with irregularities brought forward by the community of Valle del Huasco and promised to strike up an investigatory commission on Pascua Lama. In the coming weeks, the State Defense Council will determine what role they will play in a dispute being carried out by the community for irreparable environmental damage with regards to the destruction of glaciers. At the moment there is no taxation agreement between Chile and Argentina for the Pascua Lama project, along with a series of other irregularities.

For all of these reasons, we declare Mr. Harper a persona non grata and we demand that the Chilean government defend our sovereignty and ask the Canadian diplomats for answers regarding Harper’s statements, and Harper’s agenda, which does very little to maintain the health of the bilateral relations in our countries.

Signed:

Latin American Observatory on Environmental Conflicts (OLCA)
Colectivo Rexistencia
Movimiento Ciudadano Anti Pascualama
Programa Radial “Semillas de Agua”
Coordinadora de Defensa de los Valles del Tránsito y El carmen (Región de Atacama)
Casa Taller La Lucha
Environmental and Social Justice Action Network (RAJAS, Santiago)


ECUADOR

Ecuador´s mining prospects and the conflict with affected communities

By Jennifer Moore
ALAI, América Latina en Movimiento
2007-07-04 - http://www.alainet.org

"...what has happened to all of the oil extracted since March 22nd, 1967? Ecuador has produced 4.035 million barrels of oil since that time which valued at nominal historic international prices represents a sum total of $82 billion dollars. Where is this money? And I´m not speaking about riches, because the true riches are what have been destroyed, that weren´t in the ground, but rather in the biodiversity, in the life and in the cultures that have been lost." - Ex-Minister of Energy & Mines, Alberto Acosta[1], for the 40th anniversary of oil extraction in the Ecuadorian Amazon[2]

Following attempts in recent months to obtain concrete responses from the government of President Rafael Correa with regard to its plans for large-scale mining in Ecuador, revelations resulting from the current national uprising called by the National Coordinator for the Defense of Life and Sovereignty are both surprising and worrying to those involved. Highway blockades taking place across South and Central Ecuador last week faced harsh repression from police and armed forces under direct orders from the government.[3] As well, statements by the President to the press revealed a marked change in the government's tone and position, placing it in direct conflict with those organizing together with the National Coordinator.

While 2007 marks 40 years for Ecuador as an oil producing nation,[4] it has never been a major mineral producer and current large-scale mining projects have yet to enter into production. In particular cases, this is largely a result of tenacious community resistance, such as in the case of Intag in the northern province of Imbabura where struggles have been ongoing for ten years.[5] Legal reforms by past governments favoring private investment and internationally funded studies revealing rich mineral deposits throughout the central Andes and the southern Amazonian region of Ecuador[6] are making the country's mining sector very attractive to foreign investors. A recent industry report entitled "Ecuador, Number One in Potential for Pipeline Ounces of Gold," highlights Ecuador s appeal to Canadian corporations in particular.[7] To date the Ministry of Energy and Mines has granted licenses for over 4,000 mining concessions[8] which cover roughly 20% of the surface of Ecuador, including many ecologically and culturally diverse areas, according to Acción Ecológica.[9]

In opposition to efforts to make Ecuador a major mineral producer, the National Coordinator for the Defense of Life and Sovereignty and thousands mobilized by its call are convinced that there are better alternatives for the future of their communities and the country. In places where major mining projects are being developed local communities are already experiencing tremendous "social contamination" even before mineral extraction begins.[10] In addition, considering the health and environmental deterioration being faced in areas of large scale production in other parts of Latin America,[11] the National Coordinator wants Ecuador to cut its losses before production gets underway so that Ecuador can declare itself "a country free of large-scale mining."

The National Coordinator for the Defense of Life and Sovereignty

The National Coordinator for the Defense of Life and Sovereignty was established on January 26th, 2007, bringing communities in resistance together from more than eight provinces across Ecuador along with numerous environmental and human rights organizations, urban associations, and student groups. Lina Solano from the National Coordinator says that the "social and environmental impacts of large-scale mining are too great to justify this as a major source of income for the country."

From Ecuador s experience as an oil producer she says "we already know where the profits will be spent." She continues, "A large percentage will be used to pay off the external debt, that is to say it will also leave the country, while another large percentage will go toward the bureaucracy and the armed forces, with a minimum percentage remaining for education and healthcare, likely not even fulfilling the 30% established in our constitution." Currently however, to achieve such gains the government will have to amend the Mining Law which requires foreign investors to pay a minimum conservation patent per hectare and 0% royalties.[12]

The current government has recently indicated that it is planning to present reforms regarding the Mining Law to Ecuador s congress this month which would limit exploration concessions, reintroduce royalties, hold companies accountable for impacts of exploration activities and strengthen environmental regulations. The government has also signaled creation of an independent Ministry of Mines and creation of a state-owned mining company.[13]

However, the National Coordinators central demands are for the government to suspend current projects and place a moratorium on new concessions. Following investigations, they are ultimately demanding that current concessions be annulled. They premise these demands on Ecuador s constitution which guarantees communities the right to fair and informed consultation with regard to state decisions that might affect the environment.[14] Both the President and the former Minister of Energy and Mines have agreed in recent months that the communities' demands are just and that the overwhelming majority of current concessions are indeed unconstitutional for this very reason.[15]

As several major mining projects near production, the National Coordinator has been urgently seeking more concrete responses from the government. However, four months of marches, meetings and correspondence have resulted in numerous delays and little concrete action. As a result, on June 5th, the National Coordinator declared an indefinite cross-country uprising. Demonstrations taking place last week did finally receive a definitive response, but not one that they had been hoping for.

Brutal Police Repression

Attention last week focused on three highway closures which began on Tuesday and which blocked major arteries around Cuenca, the third largest city in the country and capital of the Province of Azuay. Other main routes were also closed in the Southern Amazonian provinces of Morona Santiago and Zamora Chinchipe, with additional demonstrations taking place in the central province of Chimborazo around the community of Pallatanga.

On Wednesday while visiting Azuay in order to survey areas affected by unusually heavy rains the week before, the President ordered the police to bring an end to the blockades[16] and stated to the press that the "elimination of mining concessions" proposed by the National Coordinator is "inconceivable" given the costs that the state would incur.[17] He refused to speak with protesters and police enforcement of his orders resulted in brutal repression against demonstrators, particularly within the vicinity of Cuenca .

Lina Solano describes how blockade by blockade hundreds of police used overwhelming amounts of tear gas and anti-riot vehicles to violently dislodge protesters from the highways which involved men and women of all ages. Dozens of people were taken into detention and injuries were sustained by a number of demonstrators, as well as several police officers. In the area of Tarqui, southwest of Cuenca, police exhausted their supply of tear gas while taking control of the demonstration and reportedly sprayed tear gas inside of several homes, nearly asphyxiating several children.

Several journalists on site were also threatened by police including attempts to confiscate the camera of an Indymedia journalist. Additionally, late Friday night in the area of Molleturo where campesinos were maintaining the last remaining blockage of the main highway connecting Cuenca with the port city of Guayaquil, they reported the arrival of over 400 soldiers and 150 police officers following which they decided to retreat from the roadway.

Detentions Target Leadership of the National Coordinator

Roughly thirty people were taken into detention between Wednesday and Thursday. Many even after road blocks had been cleared. Lina and two other organizers from the National Coordinator were amongst those held overnight on Wednesday.

Lina says that five police officers aggressively detained her and Nidia Soliz, also from the National Coordinator, late Wednesday afternoon. For roughly three hours they were held together in a locked car without windows and driven around the countryside before being taken to provincial police headquarters. Lina says the officers were driving "at top speed, braking abruptly, presumably so that we would bang ourselves against the inside walls of the car." Earlier in the day, Fernando Mejia of the National Coordinator was also detained.

Lina believes that their leadership was clearly targeted. Other demonstrators also reported being interrogated by police about the homes and whereabouts of leaders from the National Coordinator. Early Thursday, student supporters in particular from the University of Cuenca along with many others held tenacious demonstrations in front of government and judicial offices such that the three were granted Habeas Corpus by midday. Others held in detention were also freed, although at least 11 have charges remaining against them.

"We are incredibly surprised," says Lina Solano of the National Coordinator for the Defense of Life and Sovereignty, "because we didnt think that a government based upon the defense of our country and our sovereignty [would allow such repression to take place.]" She quotes former Minister of Energy and Mines, Alberto Acosta as having said that "not one drop of blood will be shed, no matter how profitable a project might be."

In addition, Lina says that "There´s an effort to minimize participation in our movement, to say that there are only a few hundred people in opposition and that in reality the rest of the population is in favor of these mining projects. However," she says, the reality is otherwise and says that "in all this time that the Coordinator has been organizing since the 26th of January of this year, there are thousands of people mobilizing, as much women, men, elderly, children and youth - whole families in fact - that are demonstrating more than anything in defense of our water since this is the resource that is most put at risk by large scale metal extraction."

Communities from the provinces of Imbabura, Pichincha, Bolivar, and Cotopaxi have also participated in previous demonstrations. As well, the two largest indigenous organizations in Ecuador , the CONAIE and ECUARUNARI, both released public statements last week expressing solidarity with their struggle.[18]

Government Priorities Conflict with Community Interests

President Correa´s statements to the press last Wednesday are also "incredibly worrying," says Lina. "To give a completely negative response and to say that the government is not going to support the communities petitions is a marked change."

"In the beginning," she recalls, "the government maintained that communities" interests would be put first before those of private corporations and that what the communities are asking for is just and that the government would see how to deal with the issues. "But now," she says, "the government seems to be planning to make mining a main source of sustenance for the country following the depletion of oil and to be arranging for the state to earn a percentage of mining profits to put toward areas such as education and health."

"This is horrible from our perspective, because it´s like negotiating with our lives, and in particular with the lives of thousands of rural families who are most directly affected by these mining projects."

The Subsecretary of Mining, Jorje Jurado, also made a further announcement last week stating that a High Level Commission would be struck to produce a report within 30 days concerning Project Quimsacocha. Project Quimscocha is a large gold mining initiative lead by Canadian company IAMGOLD in the high plateau (páramos) surrounding the communities of Tarqui and Victoria del Portete where local resistance has been vociferous.

However, Lina says that this announcement is a "step backward" from what the government previously promised. "Something along these lines was offered months ago by the Ministry of Energy and Mines," she says. "When we spoke with the President on March 26th he gave the green light for then-Minister of Energy & Mines, Alberto Acosta, to initiate a series of exhaustive audits concerning current projects. However, time has passed and they had to wait for people to protest so that they can now talk about striking this high level commission. We don´t know what it will mean, who will participate and if it will entail the suspension of this project." Above all, Lina is concerned that people will put their hope in this commission and that it will end up as another waste of time while advanced mining projects carry on toward production.

The Ongoing Struggle

Overall, looking back over the last five months, Lina says that the National Coordinator has succeeded in generating national debate on the issues. However, looking ahead she says, "unless other organized sectors and the rest of Ecuador respond to what is happening, regrettably we will not be able to withstand this."

Considering international solidarity she notes that Ecuador is unique in Latin America for not having a large-scale mining industry and emphasizes the country´s right to make sovereign decisions. "We ask everyone who understands what is taking place here to support this struggle. This is really about our national sovereignty and our right to say no, which I believe is incredibly important at the international level."

She adds, "Within the system that we are living in decisions are being made not even by a small group of countries anymore, but rather by a small group of transnational corporations. And these decisions are being imposed all around the world often by blood and fire. In this regard, all international solidarity is important to us in order to reclaim our right to self-determination."


[1] Ex-Minister of Energy & Mines, Alberto Acosta, stepped down on June 14th in order to declare his candidacy for the National Constituent Assembly for which elections will take place on September 30th.
[2] Alberto Acosta, "Contra la paradoja de la abundancia," La Insignia , 1-jun-07; Discurso de Alberto Acosta, economista y ministro de Ejergía y Minas de Ecuador, en el cuadragésimo aniversario del primer pozo petrolero ecuatoriano en la Amazonia. http://www.lainsignia.org/2007/junio/econ_001.htm;
[3] El Mercurio, jueves 28 de junio de 2007
[4] Alberto Acosta, ibid.
[5] "Breve Historia de la Resistencia a la Mineria" Intag, Ecuador, Sept 2006; http://www.decoin.org/historia.html
[6] Acción Ecológica, "Conflictos y Resistencia Frente a la Actividad Minera" http://www.accionecologica.org/webae/images/2005/mineria/documentos/intro.pdf
[7] James O´Rourke, "Ecuador, Number One in Potential for Pipeline Ounces of Gold," Madison Avenue Research, 11 Apr 07; http://madisonaveresearch.com/ecuadorgold.htm
[8] El Comercio, martes 5 de junio de 2007
[9] Acción Ecológica, ibid.
[10] Eduardo Tamayo G., "Ecuador: Trasnacionales mineras a la ofensiva," ALAI, 15-dec-06; http://alainet.org/active/15025&lang=es
[11] See: Luis Vittor, "Cerro de Pasco y la expansión minera, un conflicto infinito," ALAI, 07-jun-06; http://www.alainet.org/active/17965 & Luis Vittor, "Conflictos mineros en los Andes," ALAI, 19-apr-07; http://www.alainet.org/active/17001%E2%8C%A9=es
[12] Acción Ecológica, ibid.
[13] Alonso Soto, "Ecuador plans to send Congress broad mining reforms" Reuters, Jun 22-07; http://www.reuters.com/article/bondsNews/idUSN2245561420070622
[14] Constitución Politica de la Republica del Ecuador, (aprobada el 5 de junio de 1998, por la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente), "Capítulo 5: De los derechos colectivos" http://www.ecuanex.apc.org/constitucion/titulo03c.html#5
[15] El Comercio, jueves 31 de mayo de 2007; and Alberto Acosta, ibid.
[16] El Mercurio, jueves 28 de junio de 2007
[17] Movimiento para la Salud de los Pueblos-Latinoamérica, Boletin de Prensa, "Paro por la Defensa de la Vida y la Soberania: No a las Transnacionales Mineras" 28-jun-07
[18] CONAIE (Confederación de Nacionalidades Indígenas del Ecuador), Boletín de Prensa, Quito, 29-jun-07; http://www.conaie.org/es/ge_comunicados/co20072906awa.html & ECUARUNARI (Confederación de los Pueblos de Nacionalidad Kichua del Ecuador), "Llamamos al Gobierno de Rafael Correa a no ser cómplice de las empresas mineras" Quito, 28-jun-07; http://www.ecuarunari.org/es/noticias/no_20070628.html


BOLIVIA

Jindal prevé exportar 10 mln tons mineral hierro de Bolivia

Jueves 19 de Julio, 2007
Por Biman Mukherji

NUEVA DELHI (Reuters) - El grupo indio Jindal Steel and Power dijo el jueves que planea exportar 10 millones de toneladas de mineral de hierro al año desde el gigantesco yacimiento boliviano El Mutún. Al día siguiente de que Jindal y el Gobierno de Bolivia firmaran un contrato para desarrollar El Mutún, un ejecutivo del grupo indio indicó que la construcción de la infraestructura minera necesaria para cumplir la meta de exportación tardaría al menos un año.

"Vamos a invertir 2.100 millones de dólares en los próximos cinco años," dijo Naveen Jindal, director ejecutivo de la compañía, precisando que la inversión estará destinada tanto al desarrollo de la mina como a la construcción de una acería con capacidad de 1,7 millones de toneladas al año. El Gobierno izquierdista boliviano de Evo Morales otorgó a la firma india los derechos para desarrollar El Mutún hace más de un año, pero el acuerdo final fue retrasado debido a complejas disputas sobre detalles.

Jindal hará la mayor inversión extranjera directa en la historia de Bolivia para aprovechar el yacimiento ubicado en el extremo sudoriental del país, en la frontera con Brasil, y que se calcula posee una de las mayores reservas de mineral de hierro del mundo. El contrato dio al grupo indio el derecho a explotar durante 40 años el 50 por ciento de El Mutún, que tiene una reserva total calculada de más de 40.000 millones de toneladas de mineral de hierro y al menos 10.000 millones de toneladas de manganeso.

Jindal dijo que no prevé transportar el mineral a India debido a que no sería una operación económicamente viable. India posee reservas de hierro de alrededor de 23.000 millones de toneladas y es el tercer exportador mundial. El ejecutivo de Jindal agregó que la planta siderúrgica estaría concluida en el 2010 y que sólo se exportaría el acero que no pueda vender en el mercado boliviano.


GUATEMALA

Exigen desarrollo rural sin minería

Población de Santa Cruz Barillas se pronuncia
Por Alberto Ramírez
Guatemala, 19 de julio de 2007 - http://www.prensalibre.com

Vecinos de Santa Cruz Barillas, Huehuetenango, reiteraron su rechazo a la minería metálica y pidieron a las autoridades que respeten el resultado de la consulta comunitaria.

Rubén Herrera, presidente de la Coordinadora de la Consulta, informó que el resultado de esa actividad, en la cual participaron 46 mil 490 personas, fue de nueve votos a favor de la minería y 46 mil 481 en contra.

La consulta fue realizada el 23 de junio último, y ayer fueron entregados los resultados al Congreso y otras instituciones estatales. Herrera explicó que Huehuetenango es el departamento que más café exporta y el que tiene los ingresos más altos por remesas, por lo cual no necesita de la minería, sino de un plan de desarrollo rural e integral para mejorar las condiciones de las comunidades.

Hermelinda Simón, vecina del municipio, dijo que le preocupa perder el agua de su comunidad.

Desarrollo comunitario

Luis Fernando Pérez, presidente de la Comisión de Energía del Congreso, expresó que lo importante es que haya desarrollo comunitario, y no sólo beneficio empresarial. Pérez agregó que ese grupo de trabajo analiza hacer reformas a la Ley de Minería.

Carlos Salvatierra, de MadreSelva, aseguró que la población participa más en estas consultas que en las elecciones a puestos públicos, porque teme perder sus recursos naturales.

Pobladores de Santa Cruz Barillas rechazan proyectos mineros
Por PrensaLibre.com
Guatemala, miércoles 18 de julio de 2007

Los habitantes de Santa Cruz Barillas, Huehuetenango, rechazan la concesión de proyectos mineros en ese municipio, según los resultados de una consulta popular.
En el referendo efectuado el pasado 23 de junio participaron 46 mil 90 personas, de las cuales sólo nueve votaron a favor de la minería.

Según los pobladores, en el municipio hay áreas que pueden ser dadas en concesión para la exploración y explotación minera de oro y zinc. El objetivo de esta consulta, que no tiene valor legal, es que las autoridades tomen en cuenta la postura de los pobladores para que no otorguen licencias en ese municipio.

Según Rubén Herrera, presidente de la comisión coordinadora de esta consulta, los resultados serán presentados al Congreso, la Corte de Constitucionalidad y la Procuraduría de Derechos Humanos.


GUATEMALA

Ni curas se salvaron: decenas de personas heridas en protestas realizadas en Santa Bárbara y Siguatepeque

HONDURAS | 18 de julio del 2007
http://www.elheraldo.hn

Santa Bárbara. La sangre volvió a correr en las manifestaciones públicas. Ayer fueron campesinos, sacerdotes y periodistas, que protestaban contra las mineras, los que sintieron la fuerza brutal de policías revestidos con trajes antimotines, granadas lacrimógenas y toletes. El encontronazo, que dejó varias personas detenidas y heridas, se produjo en la colonia 6 de Mayo, Santa Bárbara. La orden de desalojo violento se dio luego de que los manifestantes se negaron a habilitar el paso por la carretera que conduce a occidente. La protesta fue coordinada por miembros de la Alianza Cívica por la Democracia (ACD), organización que exige una nueva ley de minería que beneficie a la población y no a las empresas mineras.

Mientras el pueblo era toleteado, en el Congreso Nacional se discutían las partes sensibles del dictamen elaborado por la Comisión de Recursos Naturales y Minería. A eso de las 5:00 de la mañana, el panorama estaba pacífico en el sector de La Flecha. Y es que la presencia de unos 100 antimotines impedía que los manifestantes cerraran el paso. A esta misma hora y a unos 20 kilómetros de distancia, otro grupo de ciudadanos se formaba para cerrar el paso a la altura de la 6 de Mayo. A eso de las 6:00 de la mañana, los manifestantes cruzaron un camión en los dos tramos de carretera, impidiendo el tráfico vehicular.

La protesta fue apoyada por los sacerdotes Marco Aurelio Lorenzo, Daniel Corea y Reginaldo García. Después de diálogos intermitentes, la orden de desalojo llegó a las 8:00 de la mañana. El sacerdote Marco Lorenzo dijo que este gobierno se comporta como "un gobierno militar represivo". Fue a eso de las 11:00 de la mañana que los antimotines empezaron a acercarse, listos para cumplir la orden recibida tres horas antes.

ENCOMENDADOS A DIOS

Cuando los uniformados avanzaban, los campesinos se tiraban a tierra en oración a Dios. Sabían que la hora de la represión se acercaba. En sus plegarias le pedían al Creador que los ayudara a defender los recursos, las fuentes de agua y a salvaguardas sus vidas. Los uniformados ni se inmutaron. La batalla campal comenzó a las 11:45 de la mañana. A esta hora, la tanqueta empezó a rociar agua, de las armas de los policías salieron bombas lacrimógenas y los toletes se empuñaron contra todo aquel que tocaba el pavimento de la carretera a occidente.

Los campesinos respondieron con piedras, con palos y, uno que otro, con los machetes que les dan de comer. Los agentes "Cobras" no tuvieron piedad. Repartieron palizas a jóvenes, adultos y ancianos. Algunas mujeres corrieron la misma suerte, ya que arrastradas y por el pelo las sacaron de sus viviendas. Al final, varias personas fueron llevadas en patrullas a las estaciones policiales, entre ellas sacerdotes y hasta periodistas que registraron el ataque brutal.

SIGUATEPEQUE

Las protestas también se hicieron sentir en Siguatepeque, Comayagua, donde al menos unos 400 afiliados al Comité Cívico de Organizaciones Indígenas de Honduras (Copinh) llegaron y se apostaron desde las 6:00 de la mañana en el puente El Calán. La manifestación era coordinado por Salvador Monsón, quien agitaba a los indígenas con cánticos y frases de reproche en contra de los miembros del Congreso Nacional.

Los líderes clérigos de Intibucá, La Paz y Lempira llegaron al lugar con el fin de ser escuchados por los entes gubernamentales. "El gobierno debe enterarse de la problemática del pueblo y si protestamos es porque las cosas no andan bien", indicó Bonifacio Cedillo, representante de la Iglesia. Después de permanecer cuatro horas sin permitir el tráfico de vehículos, fueron desalojados por los policías preventivos. Las bombas lacrimógenas se hicieron sentir entre los indígenas al filo de las 9:45.

Por la fuerza fueron retirados la mayoría de ellos y los que se opusieron pagaron su decisión con sangre. "Tratamos de dialogar con ellos en tres ocasiones, pero no llegamos a un acuerdo", dijo el subcomisionado Leonel Enamorado, quien dio la orden para que los agitadores fueran desalojados del puente. Contrario a la versión policial, las autoridades del Copinh aseveraron que no hubo ningún dialogo con ellos y que simplemente los habían sacado por la fuerza. "Vamos a morir en el campo de batalla", eran las palabras que más se escuchaban en el alboroto.


Pobladores exigen nueva Ley de Minería: enfrentamiento dejó un resultado de 71 detenidos y 12 heridos en batalla campal

Lilian Mejía, Mauricio Pérez y Carlos Girón

MIERCOLES 18 DE JULIO DE 2007
http://www.laprensahn.com/

Santa Bárbara. Sangre, gritos de socorro, lágrimas, decenas detenciones y heridos matizaron ayer el violento desalojo que se produjo en la colonia 6 de mayo, Santa Bárbara, luego que un grupo de manifestantes se negaran a habilitar la carretera que conduce a Occidente. La protesta, coordinada por miembros de la Alianza Cívica por la Democracia, ACD, en esa zona del país y en otras, buscaba exigir la emisión de una nueva Ley de Minería que beneficie a la población y no a las empresas que se dedican a ese rubro. La peor parte ayer se la llevaron los pobladores de Occidente. Mientras en el Congreso Nacional se discutían las partes sensibles del dictamen elaborado por la Comisión de Recursos Naturales y Minería, en la zona occidental se desató la violencia pues los ciudadanos obstaculizaron la vía.

A las cinco de la mañana, el panorama se tornaba pacífico en el sector de La Flecha. La presencia de unos 100 policías antimotines impedía que los manifestantes cerraran el paso a los vehículos, pero a esa misma hora, y a unos 20 kilómetros, otro grupo de manifestantes se formaban para cerrar el paso a la altura de la 6 de mayo. Los manifestantes obligaron a un conductor a cruzar un camión para obstaculizar la vía e impedir el tránsito vehicular.

La tensión entonces se empezó a apoderar de los pobladores, que eran apoyados por los sacerdotes Marco Aurelio Lorenzo, Daniel Corea, Reginaldo García, quienes intentaron mediar con las autoridades policiales hasta que los uniformados, a las 8.00 de la mañana, recibieron la orden de desalojar el lugar. Los líderes católicos describieron a las autoridades del país como "un gobierno militar represivo", expresó el sacerdote Marco Aurelio Lorenzo. A las 11.00 am. los antimotines empezaron a acercarse a los manifestantes para hacer cumplir la orden. Los protestantes entonces se arrodillaron y empezaron a cantar alabanzas, pero nada funcionó y las autoridades tomaron acción.

Unos 45 minutos después, la tanqueta empezó a rociar agua dando inicio a la batalla. Las bombas lacrimógenas empezaron a hacer efecto, los manifestantes desesperados buscaban un lugar donde refugiarse mientras otros hacían frente con machetes, piedras y palos. Pero la pesadilla no acabó ahí, los antimotines rompieron puertas y sacaron a jóvenes y ancianos, a quienes golpearon con dureza.

El enfrentamiento dejó como resultado 61 detenidos, entre ellos los sacerdotes Marco Lorenzo y Reginaldo García, quienes fueron puestos en libertad posteriormente. Además 12 personas fueron heridas; ocho manifestantes y cuatro agentes policiales. El subcomisionado de la jefatura 16, Silvio Inestroza, manifestó que intentaron dialogar; pero los manifestantes no cedieron. "No podemos permitir la toma de carreteras, es un abuso a la libre locomoción", aseveró. Se le consultó al alto comisionado Napoleón Nassar, si era necesario el exceso de violencia a lo que contestó: "si alguien se siente agraviado ahí está la fiscalía y los derechos humanos".

En Siguatepeque

Las protestas también se hicieron sentir en Comayagua, en donde al menos unos 400 afiliados al Comité Cívico de Organizaciones Indígenas de Honduras, Copinh, llegaron y se apostaron desde la seis de la mañana en el puente El Calán, dando a conocer su descontento con el gobierno y exigiendo mejoras a la salud de los pobladores y de sus tierras. La manifestación era coordinada por Salvador Monson, quien agitaba a los indígenas con cánticos y frases de reproche en contra de los miembros del Congreso Nacional.

Los líderes eclesiásticos de los departamentos de Intibucá, La Paz y Lempira acaloraron el lugar con el fin de ser escuchados por los entes gubernamentales. "El gobierno debe enterarse de la problemática del pueblo y si protestamos es porque las cosas no andan bien", indicó Bonifacio Cedillo, representante de la iglesia. Después de permanecer cuatro horas sin permitir el tráfico de vehículos, ellos fueron desalojados por los policías preventivos. Las bombas lacrimógenas se hicieron sentir entre los indígenas al filo de las 9.45 de la mañana. "Tratamos de dialogar con ellos en tres ocasiones pero no llegamos a un acuerdo", dijo el subcomisionado Leonel Enamorado, quien dio la orden para que los agitadores fueran desalojados del puente.

Contrario a la versión policial, las autoridades del Copinh aseveraron que no hubo ningún diálogo con ellos y que simplemente los habían sacado por la fuerza. "Vamos a morir en el campo de batalla" eran las palabras que más se escuchaba en el alboroto. La Policía detuvo a 10 personas. Entre los detenidos se encontraba un párroco de la iglesia católica del departamento de Intibucá, Mario Rivas, quien desde el interior de la celda asevero que fue golpeado en repetidas veces por parte de los preventivos.

Los preventivos también despojaron de sus elementos de trabajo a los periodistas de la comunidad católica Pablo Munguía y Justo Sorto. Las otras siete personas que estaban en la bartolina, entre ellos una transeúnte, argumentaron que no se opusieron pero fueron agredidos.

Opiniones

Primero son los pobres. La ley se debe aprobar para impedir la existencia de más explotación a cielo abierto, sino correrá la sangre". Luis Alfonso Santos, Obispo de Copán.

En esta ley no se está negociando ni discutiendo nada relacionado con la retroactividad porque atenta contra la seguridad jurídica". Mayra Mejía, Ministra de Serna.

Respeto la opinión de la ministra, pero considero que todo lo relacionado al bienestar común está sobre cualquier ley o principio jurídico". Nelson ávila, Comisionado presidencial.

La ley se está llevando por buen camino y se busca el consenso, para obtener una legislación en beneficio de los más pobres y de las comunidades". Arnoldo Avilez, Dictaminador.
Acuerdos

Consenso y revisión de pagos. El presidente del Congreso Nacional, Roberto Micheletti, dijo que la Ley de Minería no será aprobada sin antes ser consensuada. Coincidió con el obispo Luis Santos, que las mineras han pagado demasiado poco en materia tributaria y hará una revisión.

No a la expropiación. La comisión dictaminadora coincidió con los demás sectores involucrados en que si el propietario de un predio, que se pudiera dar para explotación minera no está de acuerdo en cederlo, no será sujeto esto ni siquiera de conciliación legal.

Pago del servicio de agua. Los recursos hídricos son actualmente usados por las concesionarias sin pagar por el servicio. La nueva ley contempla una contrata distinta al permiso para la explotación minera, debiendo ajustarse a la normativa existente para ese fin.

Cielo abierto, la gran polémica. Tegucigalpa. Uno de los puntos más álgidos de la polémica de ayer fue si la ley impediría que las cinco mineras instaladas en Honduras siguieran o no explotando a cielo abierto, lo que causa mayor contaminación por el uso de cianuro u otros químicos.

El obispo Luis Alfonso Santos, en representación de las fuerzas vivas agrupadas en distintas organizaciones, se reunió ayer con la ministra de la Secretaría de Recursos Naturales y Ambiente, Serna, Mayra Mejía; el enviado presidencial Nelson Ávila y el presidente de la Comisión parlamentaria dictaminadora, Arnoldo Avilez, en procura de lograr acuerdos sobre la compleja ley.

Otro punto que no se pudo consensuar ayer fue la retroactividad de la ley. Según el dictamen, hay sanciones para las empresas que usen metales pesados. El obispo de Copán y sus seguidores querían que la ley sancionara a las empresas que han contaminado el ambiente, las aguas y afectado la salud de los pobladores.

Puntos claves consensuados

1. De la propiedad. Los minerales son del Estado, ya sea que se hallen en el suelo o el subsuelo. Además, las mineras no podrán vender o permutar un yacimiento sin previa autorización del Estado.

2. La prohibición. Se mantiene la prohibición de explotar oro y plata a cielo abierto, la utilización de metales pesados como el cianuro, el mercurio y el arsénico y la no utilización de zonas protegidas para fines de explotación minera.

3. De los impuestos. Las partes coincidieron en los impuestos fijados por la Comisión de Dictamen. Las mineras pagarán un 15% de impuestos sobre ventas brutas, un 12% sobre ventas netas, 4% de ISR y 3% de impuesto municipal.

4. Del canon. Además, se establece un canon que consiste en el pago por el uso de territorio cuyo monto va en función a la cantidad de tierra adjudicada.

5. De Defomín. Desaparecerá la Dirección de Fomento de la Minería, Defomin, se creará el Instituto Hondureño de Geología y Minas, Ihgemin. El término "concesión" se reemplazará por el de "licencia" y se eliminará la expropiación forzosa.

Una ley, largo proceso

Durante el 2003: El cardenal Óscar Andrés Rodríguez entregó al presidente del Congreso Nacional el anteproyecto que contenía las reformas a la Ley de Minería.

Marzo de 2007: El Congreso Nacional aprobó los primeros artículos de la ley, en tercer debate, pero no se continuó porque la misma contenía muchas ventajas para las mineras.

Julio de 2007: El presidente del Congreso Nacional, Roberto Micheletti, se comprometió públicamente a aprobar la Ley de Minería, sin perjuicio para las comunidades.


Diez heridos y 20 detenidos tras desalojo carreteras en Honduras

Martes 17 de Julio, 2007

TEGUCIGALPA (Reuters) - Diez heridos y alrededor de 20 detenidos dejó el martes en Honduras el desalojo violento de varias carreteras luego de que pobladores las bloquearan para exigir la aprobación de una nueva ley de minería que prohíba la explotación mineral a cielo abierto. Entre los detenidos están tres sacerdotes católicos y 10 indígenas de la etnia lenca, descendientes de los mayas, en un movimiento convocado por una llamada Alianza Cívica por la Democracia, una coalición de organizaciones civiles no gubernamentales.

El sector empresarial dice que una prohibición de explotar a cielo abierto conduciría al fin de la inversión en el sector. Los manifestantes, entre ellos campesinos y ambientalistas, ocuparon por casi cinco horas varios tramos en la llamada carretera de Occidente, que comunica con los vecinos El Salvador y Guatemala; la carretera del Norte, que permite el tránsito terrestre entre el centro y el norte del país, y la de Olancho en el este, una importante zona agrícola y ganadera.

"Las carreteras han sido desalojadas de manifestantes, en algunos casos después del diálogo con los dirigentes y en dos de los sitios, uno en Siguatepeque (donde estaban los lencas) y en La Flecha (en la carretera de Occidente) hubo que hacer uso de fuerza," dijo a Reuters el portavoz del Ministerio de Seguridad, subcomisionado Héctor Iván Mejía.

El Congreso se dispone a discutir una serie de reformas a la ley de minería vigente, pero la Alianza reclama que se elabore una nueva legislación que prohíba la explotación de minas a cielo abierto e incremente los cánones a las compañías que extraen oro, plata, zinc y plomo en el país. "Sabemos que contamina y daña la salud de los hondureños, y (queremos) que se eleven los cánones que pagan estas compañías mineras internacionales," dijo Juan Elvir, uno de los dirigentes de una llamada Alianza Cívica por la Democracia.

La ministra de Recursos Naturales y Ambiente, Mayra Mejía, dijo que la protesta convocada por la Alianza, "no tiene sustento, pues en las reformas que se discutirá en el Congreso se considera la prohibición de la minería a cielo abierto y elevar los cánones de explotación."

Las exportaciones minerales generaron en el 2006 a Honduras 203 millones de dólares, constituyéndose en el tercer rubro de ingreso de divisas por ventas de productos básicos al exterior.

Desde que asumió el poder en enero del 2006, el presidente Manuel Zelaya expresó su rechazo a la técnica a cielo abierto y prohibió la emisión de nuevos permisos de explotación minera a la espera de la aprobación de una nueva legislación minera, estancada en el Congreso. En Honduras, operan subsidiarias de las canadienses Goldcorp Inc. y Yamana Gold que explotan oro con la técnica a cielo abierto. La estadounidense Mayan Gold también extrae oro y Breakwater Resorces Limited explota zinc, plomo y plata. Recientemente, Goldcorp Inc. anunció que cesará la operación en el 2010 de su mina San Martín, en el centro del país, y se retirará de Honduras debido a la hostilidad del Gobierno tras recibir multas por contaminar un río.


BREVE INFORME DE LOS HECHOS OCURRIDOS EN LAS MANIFESTACIONES POR UNA NUEVA LEY DE MINERIA EN HONDURAS
ALIANZA CIVICA POR LA DEMOCRACIA (ACD)

El día de ayer (martes 17 de julio) miles de personas se dieron cita en diferentes puntos geográficos de Honduras para realizar una manifestación pacifica en pro de la aprobación de una nueva Ley de Minería que vele por el beneficio del pueblo y no una simple reforma,que deja muchas lagunas que favorecen a las transnacionales mineras. Los puntos donde se realizaron las manifestaciones fueron: San Marcos, Ocotepeque; Santa Rosa de Copán; Colonia 6 de Mayo y La Flecha, Santa Bárbara; Siguatepeque, Comayagua; Catacamas, Olancho; Parque Central de San Pedro Sula, Municipalidad de Danli, El Paraíso; bajos del Congreso Nacional en Tegucigalpa.

Desafortunadamente en lugares como la 6 de Mayo y Siguatepeque la situación tomo un giro inesperado, pues hubo agresiones por parte de miembros de la policía nacional hacia los manifestantes, quienes arremetieron a golpes y uso de bombas lacrimógenas, tanqueta de agua a presión y los mas grave el uso de armas de fuego, lo que provoco decenas de heridos y detenidos y fueron despojados de cámaras fotográficas y de video cuando capturaban las imágenes del abuso de poder. El saldo de dicho enfrentamiento es aproximadamente 59 detenidos, 1 policía y 17 manifestantes heridos, entre otros: Geovany López (16), Lucio López (46), Eliseo Mejia (25) Lázaro Ardon (55), (rostro desfigurado), Freddy López (16) Antonio Sánchez (60) Giovanni Mejia (18), Cruz Aguirre (62) Dionisio Calderón (47) Eliseo Quintanilla (20) Jesús Bautista (52), Francisco López (50) Trinidad Perdomo (20), Julio Cuellar (49), Heridos de bala: Elder Carranza (20), estado delicado; Anael Antonio Henríquez (27) y un anciano de 65 años actualmente desaparecido.

Aquí desmentimos públicamente las declaraciones del Jefe Departamental de la Policía Preventiva, Silvio Edmundo Inestroza, quien afirmó que Elder Carranza es miembro de dicha institución, lo que es falso ya que este joven es un humilde campesino que participaba en la manifestación. Los hechos anteriormente descritos demuestran la poca tolerancia de los Órganos represivos del Estado hacia los ciudadanos que de forma pacifica demandaron una nueva Ley de Minería, como siempre la justificación de la Policía es que los manifestantes estaban armados y se hirieron entre ellos, aduciendo además que iniciaron los actos de violencia. Cabe destacar que al momento del ataque policial losmanifestantes oraban. Ante esto, la gente simplemente trató de defenderse y albergarse en casas vecinas, de donde fueron sacados violentamente.

Simultáneamente, La comisión de Negociación integrada por Mons. Luis Alfonso Santos Purificación Hernández, Padre Rudy Mejia, Francisco Machado, Martín Erazo, Roger Escober y Pedro Rodolfo Arteaga, iniciaron reuniones con la Comisión del Poder Ejecutivo que preparó la Propuesta de Ley de Minería liderada por el Asesor Presidencial en Materia Económica: Nelson Avila. Seguidamente se trasladaron al Congreso Nacional para reunirse con el Pleno de la Comisión de Dictamen, encabezado por su Coordinar Lic. Arnoldo Avilez, Miembros de Caritas y el Obispo Auxiliar Juan José Pineda Fasquelle, Miembros de Serna encabezados por la Ministra Mayra Mejía; Representantes de Dirección de Fomento a la Minería (DEFOMIN) encabezado por su director Roberto Elvir y Representantes de la Asociación de Minerías No Metálicas y otras, donde se incorporó los aspectos centrales que demanda la Alianza Cívica por la Democracia, y además se condicionó este acuerdo preliminar a una revisión mas exhaustiva del texto de toda la Ley, comprometiéndoseLa Comisión de Minería a respetar lo incorporado en esta reunión y los nuevos aportes.

Seguidamente se tuvo una reunión con parte de la Directiva del Congreso Nacional encabezada por su Presidente Roberto Micheletti Bain y el Secretario José Alfredo Saavedra, además estuvo Arnoldo Avilez, y Ramón Velásquez Nazar en representación de La Comisión de Dictamen, el Presidente Micheletti ratifico los acuerdos y se comprometió a invitar a representantes de la ACD durante la discusión de dicha ley en el Congreso Nacional la cual iniciará el 14 de agosto próximo y pidió el sello y la venia de Mons. Luís Alfonso Santos quien selló con una oración final su compromiso.


ARGENTINA

Juicio público a la multinacional minera: rotundo pedido de expulsión para la empresa Barrick Gold

La Ropja, 9 de julio, 2007
http://www.elindependiente.com.ar/

Durante el extenso juicio público que se realizó ayer en el club Independiente de Chilecito, fue terminante el pedido de "expulsión y condena" a la multinacional canadiense Barrick Gold. Alegaron los "daños irreparables" que acarrea a las comunidades donde realiza las explotaciones mineras. Hubo representantes del país, como así también de EE.UU., Canadá y Chile.
CHILECITO, (De nuestra agencia) - En un extenso juicio público que se realizó ayer en esta ciudad, a la multinacional canadiense Barrick Gold, fue terminante el pedido de "expulsión y condena" a la empresa por los "daños irreparables" que acarrea a las comunidades donde realiza explotaciones mineras. El pedido fue expuesto por el investigador y periodista Javier Rodríguez Pardo, que obró como fiscal y con sus dichos arrancó un largo aplauso de la concurrencia que reflejo el apoyo a lo solicitado.

En un club Independiente, que se mostró colmado durante toda la jornada, ayer se recreó la escena de un juicio debidamente conformado con tribunal, fiscal acusador y defensor. El tribunal estuvo integrado por Carlos de la Vega, titular de la Cámara Nogalera Provincial; el abogado litigante Alejandro Moreno; Miguel Mott, enólogo, productor y titular del Consorcio de Usuarios de Agua de Chilecito; el abogado Carlos Enrique del Moral, ex camarista de Chamical, y el psiquiatra Ben Ami Shardgrodsky, miembro de ATE y CTA.

El juicio incluyó una ronda de testigos provenientes de Estados Unidos, Canadá, y Chile, como desde poblaciones de la Argentina que padecen las terribles consecuencias de la prácticas mineras de la empresa. Los testimonios desgranados durante esta etapa del juicio, fueron atentamente seguidos por la concurrencia, que no terminaba de salir de su asombro por los tristes sucesos comentados y que en muchos casos, fueron apuntalados por material multimedia.

LA DEFENSA

Como en todo juicio, la Barrick Gold también tuvo su defensor, en este caso a cargo de un californiano de nombre David Modersbach, quien dejó impresa la idea de que "nosotros estamos acá porque nos invitaron del Gobierno para venir a invertir", lo que sirvió para simbolizar la complicidad que requiere la empresa para realizar sus actividades.

DAñO IRREPARABLE

Ya en diálogo con la Agencia Chilecito de EL INDEPENDIENTE, Rodríguez Pardo dijo que lo que se pretende con este juicio es que "la gente tome idea y conocimiento de cuáles son los actores que intervienen en el daño tan grande e irreparable, que tienen estas provincias cordilleranas por la minería a cielo abierto y con compuestos químicos"

Resaltó que la exploración minera también produce impacto negativo en el medio ambiente y que en la etapa de explotación es peor, porque "se consume mucha agua y energía, el daño se va a ver a corto plazo, porque esta minería no es como la que se hizo en la época de La Mejicana, hoy el mineral no está en estado vetiforme y para obtenerlo vuelan montañas a lo tonto con una promiscuidad que espanta y luego se hace la conocida lixiviación con tóxicos".

Recordó que "estamos hablando de minerales metalíferos no renovables y no vienen a llevarse una explotación, vienen por todo, cientos de explotaciones en la Cordillera de los Andes y lo peor es que no dejan nada, ni dinero, nadie puede hablar que hay un canje de trabajo por saqueo, porque al principio hay un poquito de gente que trabaja, después hay una tecnología moderna con computación y ahí termina todo, son todos técnicos y especialistas que vienen de otro lado".

Se refirió al caso del Famatina, en especial diciendo que "lo primero que va hacer será generar un gran éxodo de gente por la población afectada; si del Famatina bajan 760 litros de agua por segundo y si la minera va a usar 1.000 por segundo, ¿cómo lo sabemos nosotros de dónde van a sacar?... Ellos dicen de perforaciones, ¿pero cómo en una zona como esta?".

SITUACIóN DE LA PROVINCIA

Rodríguez Pardo, también opinó sobre la situación institucional de La Rioja en torno a la explotación minera. En ese sentido, habló sobre la ley que fue sancionada recientemente y que prohíbe la explotación contaminante. "Esta ley está manejada temporariamente por la gobernación de turno, también se habló de un plebiscito para ver si esto era o no factible, ahora borraron el plebiscito porque dicen que la empresa se fue, eso es mentira, la Barrick sigue mintiendo, porque prefiere decir que no le importa por ahora, y dejar latente eso a que la Bolsa de Valores se entere de que aquí los echaron, y se precipiten su dineros en el mercado".


Juicio público a la multinacional minera: rotundo pedido de expulsión para la empresa Barrick Gold

La Ropja, 9 de julio, 2007
http://www.elindependiente.com.ar/

Durante el extenso juicio público que se realizó ayer en el club Independiente de Chilecito, fue terminante el pedido de "expulsión y condena" a la multinacional canadiense Barrick Gold. Alegaron los "daños irreparables" que acarrea a las comunidades donde realiza las explotaciones mineras. Hubo representantes del país, como así también de EE.UU., Canadá y Chile.
CHILECITO, (De nuestra agencia) - En un extenso juicio público que se realizó ayer en esta ciudad, a la multinacional canadiense Barrick Gold, fue terminante el pedido de "expulsión y condena" a la empresa por los "daños irreparables" que acarrea a las comunidades donde realiza explotaciones mineras. El pedido fue expuesto por el investigador y periodista Javier Rodríguez Pardo, que obró como fiscal y con sus dichos arrancó un largo aplauso de la concurrencia que reflejo el apoyo a lo solicitado.

En un club Independiente, que se mostró colmado durante toda la jornada, ayer se recreó la escena de un juicio debidamente conformado con tribunal, fiscal acusador y defensor. El tribunal estuvo integrado por Carlos de la Vega, titular de la Cámara Nogalera Provincial; el abogado litigante Alejandro Moreno; Miguel Mott, enólogo, productor y titular del Consorcio de Usuarios de Agua de Chilecito; el abogado Carlos Enrique del Moral, ex camarista de Chamical, y el psiquiatra Ben Ami Shardgrodsky, miembro de ATE y CTA.

El juicio incluyó una ronda de testigos provenientes de Estados Unidos, Canadá, y Chile, como desde poblaciones de la Argentina que padecen las terribles consecuencias de la prácticas mineras de la empresa. Los testimonios desgranados durante esta etapa del juicio, fueron atentamente seguidos por la concurrencia, que no terminaba de salir de su asombro por los tristes sucesos comentados y que en muchos casos, fueron apuntalados por material multimedia.

LA DEFENSA

Como en todo juicio, la Barrick Gold también tuvo su defensor, en este caso a cargo de un californiano de nombre David Modersbach, quien dejó impresa la idea de que "nosotros estamos acá porque nos invitaron del Gobierno para venir a invertir", lo que sirvió para simbolizar la complicidad que requiere la empresa para realizar sus actividades.

DAñO IRREPARABLE

Ya en diálogo con la Agencia Chilecito de EL INDEPENDIENTE, Rodríguez Pardo dijo que lo que se pretende con este juicio es que "la gente tome idea y conocimiento de cuáles son los actores que intervienen en el daño tan grande e irreparable, que tienen estas provincias cordilleranas por la minería a cielo abierto y con compuestos químicos"

Resaltó que la exploración minera también produce impacto negativo en el medio ambiente y que en la etapa de explotación es peor, porque "se consume mucha agua y energía, el daño se va a ver a corto plazo, porque esta minería no es como la que se hizo en la época de La Mejicana, hoy el mineral no está en estado vetiforme y para obtenerlo vuelan montañas a lo tonto con una promiscuidad que espanta y luego se hace la conocida lixiviación con tóxicos".

Recordó que "estamos hablando de minerales metalíferos no renovables y no vienen a llevarse una explotación, vienen por todo, cientos de explotaciones en la Cordillera de los Andes y lo peor es que no dejan nada, ni dinero, nadie puede hablar que hay un canje de trabajo por saqueo, porque al principio hay un poquito de gente que trabaja, después hay una tecnología moderna con computación y ahí termina todo, son todos técnicos y especialistas que vienen de otro lado".

Se refirió al caso del Famatina, en especial diciendo que "lo primero que va hacer será generar un gran éxodo de gente por la población afectada; si del Famatina bajan 760 litros de agua por segundo y si la minera va a usar 1.000 por segundo, ¿cómo lo sabemos nosotros de dónde van a sacar?... Ellos dicen de perforaciones, ¿pero cómo en una zona como esta?".

SITUACIóN DE LA PROVINCIA

Rodríguez Pardo, también opinó sobre la situación institucional de La Rioja en torno a la explotación minera. En ese sentido, habló sobre la ley que fue sancionada recientemente y que prohíbe la explotación contaminante. "Esta ley está manejada temporariamente por la gobernación de turno, también se habló de un plebiscito para ver si esto era o no factible, ahora borraron el plebiscito porque dicen que la empresa se fue, eso es mentira, la Barrick sigue mintiendo, porque prefiere decir que no le importa por ahora, y dejar latente eso a que la Bolsa de Valores se entere de que aquí los echaron, y se precipiten su dineros en el mercado".


COLOMBIA

Ojo con los páramos
Colombia, 13 de Julio de 2007
Editorial Diario EL TIEMPO
http://www.eltiempo.com

Los 50 días de operaciones de Geoperforaciones, una empresa contratada por la siderúrgica Acerías Paz de Río para analizar mantos de carbón, le salieron caros al páramo de Rabanal, entre Boyacá y Cundinamarca. Se perforó un pozo de 350 metros de profundidad, se talaron 25 mil plantas de frailejón, se abrió una vía en pleno páramo y se taponaron los drenajes y las quebradas que surten de agua a más de 300.000 personas de ocho municipios que viven cerca del ecosistema. En palabras del director de Corpoboyacá, se "causó un daño muy grande en 10 mil metros cuadrados del lugar y se afectó una especie de frailejón, que está en vía de extinción". Muchas de las plantas destruidas tenían 200 años. Este es apenas un ejemplo, recientemente denunciado en este diario, de lo poco que les importan a algunos nuestros páramos, ecosistema único en el mundo, concentrado casi exclusivamente en Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador y Perú, y extremadamente frágil.

El páramo es fuente vital de agua, sirve al almacenamiento de CO2 y es soporte de biodiversidad endémica, además de ser espacio de desarrollo de culturas indígenas y campesinas andinas. Es un ecosistema muy vulnerable y gravemente amenazado por el cambio climático y las actividades extractivas y agropecuarias. Por su importancia, el de Rabanal ha sido escogido como uno de los sitios piloto para Colombia en el marco del Proyecto Páramo Andino, financiado por el Fondo Global para el Medio Ambiente, con el fin de proteger este valioso ecosistema. De allí se surten casi un centenar de acueductos y varios embalses y lagunas que dan agua a unas 180 mil personas y riego a más de un millón de hectáreas. Y la de Acerías dista de ser la primera intervención extractiva. En el 2001 se reportaron allí 44 explotaciones de carbón, 14 coquizadoras y 227 hornos. Según los registros del Ministerio de Minas, hay 22 registros para extracción de carbón y uno de materiales de construcción en la zona. Sobra describir el impacto ambiental de semejante colonización minera.

Lamentablemente, lo que pasa en Rabanal no es la excepción. Muchos otros páramos se ven amenazados por la explotación de oro, carbón, gravas y calizas y el pastoreo, la ganadería y el uso no indicado de la tierra . Colombia tiene un millón largo de hectáreas de páramo. A fines del 2005, en 311 mil de ellas había solicitudes de explotación minera, y en 62 mil, títulos mineros otorgados. La amenaza que se cierne sobre los páramos es, pues, muy alta. Un confuso artículo del Código de Minas del 2001 sobre zonas excluibles de la minería sirve para continuar otorgando títulos en áreas de gran sensibilidad ambiental. Esto, pese a la condición impuesta por la Corte Constitucional, que precisó, al interpretar tal artículo, que "la decisión debe inclinarse necesariamente hacia la protección del medio ambiente, pues si se adelanta la actividad minera y luego se demuestra que ocasionaba un grave daño ambiental, sería imposible revertir sus consecuencias" (Sentencia C-339 del 2002). Eso es exactamente lo que ha pasado en Rabanal.¿Quién va ahora a reponer los frailejones? La solución es obvia: además de poner una multa ejemplar a los responsables de daños como el producido allí, urge reformar los artículos pertinentes del Código de Minas y poner en primer plano lo más importante: la defensa y preservación de los páramos. El Ministerio del Ambiente tiene la palabra.


PERU

Los nuevos dueños del Perú

La Republica, Domingo 01 de julio del 2007
Por Pedro Francke
Profesor del Departamento de Economía de la PUCP
http://www.larepublica.com.pe

Hay siete ejecutivos en el Perú que ganan más de un millón de soles anuales. Se concentran principalmente en el sector minero, según la consultora Deloitte. El sueldo más alto de un gerente en el Perú es de un millón 400 mil soles anuales: el equivalente a 120 mil soles mensuales. Trato de imaginarme qué haría si recibiera 120 mil soles todos los meses, mes tras mes, año tras año. ¿Me compraría un departamento y lo amoblaría todos los meses? Con 120 mil soles lo puedo hacer. ¿O mejor ahorro y me compro una casa grande cada tres meses? ¿Pero qué me haría con tantas casas? ¿Gastaría en yates, playas completas para mí solo, mayordomos? ¿En qué puede una persona gastar 120 mil soles TODOS los meses del año?

Parece que los gerentes mineros ganan mucho dinero. Si los comparamos con lo que ganan los obreros mineros de Casapalca, no cabe duda: un solo gerente minero gana más que 200 trabajadores juntos. Pero si lo que ganan los gerentes parece mucho, miren lo que ganan los dueños de las empresas. Los propietarios de las acciones tipo C de Southern Peru Copper Corp. han visto cómo sus acciones han pasado de valer 10 mil millones de dólares hace un año, a valer 27 mil millones hoy: una ganancia de 17 mil millones de dólares, más de 50 mil millones de soles. Esta cifra definitivamente escapa a mi imaginación. No sé calcular cuántas maletas llenas de billetes se necesitarían para poner todo ese dinero. ¿En obreros, cuanto sería?

Pues lo que ha ganado ese grupo con sus acciones, solo de esa empresa, en el último año, es más que lo que ganan TODOS los obreros del Perú, de todos los sectores y empresas, en un año. Un obrero en el Perú gana en promedio 980 soles mensuales. Si juntamos los salarios de un millón de trabajadores peruanos, mes a mes, durante todo el año, no alcanzamos la suma de lo que han ganado un grupo de accionistas de Southern.

Felizmente, pensarán nuestros lectores, el Estado obtiene parte de esas ganancias mediante impuestos. De esa manera, dirán, algo nos toca al resto de los peruanos. ERROR. Quien piensa así está equivocado. La ley peruana establece que quienes tienen acciones en la bolsa y obtienen ganancias porque estas suben de precio no pagan impuestos por eso. A usted y a mí, trabajadores dependientes, cada vez que recibimos nuestro cheque mensual ya nos descontaron el impuesto a la renta. Pero por las ganancias obtenidas en la bolsa de valores no se paga nada, ni un sol, cero, nil.

Southern es una de las tres grandes empresas mineras del Perú, junto con Antamina y Yanacocha concentran la mitad de toda la producción minera nacional, pero no podemos dar cifras similares de las otras dos porque no cotizan en la bolsa de valores. Sin embargo sabemos que Antamina aumentó sus ingresos en US$ 2,500 millones anuales solo por efecto del aumento internacional de los precios del cobre: dinero llovido del cielo, lotería feliz. En fin, el mundo es así: cada quien baila con su propio pañuelo. Total, si Dios se los dio, que San Pedro se los bendiga. Oops... otro error. Resulta que los minerales que se encuentran en el territorio peruano, según nuestra Constitución, pertenecen a la Nación. El pañuelo no es de ellos. Esa riqueza no se la dio Dios, es de todos los peruanos. Pero si el billete de lotería es nuestro, ¿por qué al menos no vamos a medias?

Óbolo voluntario: si solo nos dieran la mitad

El año pasado, las principales empresas mineras tuvieron ganancias por 22 mil millones de soles. Diez mil millones de soles más que el año anterior, gracias a que los precios del cobre y el zinc se cuadruplicaron y los precios de los otros metales se duplicaron. El gobierno aprista ha negociado que las empresas aporten 500 millones de soles anuales al "Programa minero de solidaridad con el pueblo", apenas el 5% de las sobreganancias. En cambio en Ecuador las empresas petroleras deben pagar un impuesto a las sobreganancias del 50%. En Botswana el Estado recibe el 80% de las utilidades de la principal mina de diamantes, que es su riqueza mineral, gracias a lo cual es el país del mundo que más ha crecido económicamente desde 1960.

Esto haríamos con S/. 5 mil millones

Si nuestro gobierno hubiera hecho como Ecuador, recibiría no 500 sino 5 mil millones de soles ANUALES. ¿Cuál es la diferencia? Con este dinero se podría:

Otorgar S/. 100 mensuales a TODAS las familias pobres extremas del Perú: Un total de S/. 900 millones.

Hacer gratis la atención, medicinas, diagnósticos y operaciones en los hospitales y centros del Ministerio de Salud, y tener brigadas de salud itinerantes en 100 provincias con zonas alejadas: S/. 600 millones.

Dar pensiones básicas de S/. 200 mensuales a todos los peruanos mayores de 65 años que habitan en el campo: Un total de S/. 800 millones.

Dar mil soles por aula, para su refacción y mobiliario, a las asociaciones de padres de familias y directores de colegios públicos: Un total de S/. 300 millones.

Construir sistemas de agua potable para 3 mil pueblos rurales donde viven millón y medio de familias: S/. 1,000 millones.

Duplicar los beneficios entregados a los comités del vaso de leche y comedores populares, otorgando a las madres organizadas recursos para proyectos sociales y económicos: S/. 400 millones.


Sitios con pinturas rupestres y petroglifos de Puno en peligro

Lima, 16 de Julio de 2007

Al Señor Presidente del Gobierno Regional de Puno
Al Señor Ministro de Energía y Minas
A la Directora del Instituto Nacional de Cultura

En el Sur-oriente del Perú se encuentran más de un centenar de sitios con pinturas rupestres y petroglifos de gran antigüedad y de alto valor estético e informativo en los distritos de Macusani y Corani en la provincia de Carabaya, departamento de Puno. Estas manifestaciones rupestres constituyen un patrimonio natural de extraordinaria belleza. Las comunidades campesinas, en cuyo territorio se localiza la mayor cantidad de sitios rupestres, se llaman Tantamaco e Isivilla.

Los registros de los sitios rupestres realizados en los últimos años demuestran que los dos distritos carabayinos mencionados albergan la mayor concentración de sitios de arte rupestre del período Arcaico (aprox. 8000-5000 AP), es decir, de la época de cazadores-recolectores y de incipientes domesticadores de camélidos, en el Perú. Por lo cual han sido declarados como Patrimonio Cultural del Perú a fines del año 2005.

La gran concentración de sitios y su variedad en la escenificación de la caza de camélidos y cérvidos, en la representación humana y en el empleo de diferentes técnicas de caza y captura de animales, además de la extensa gama de colores usadas en las composiciones y la ubicación de los sitios a gran altura (hasta 4600 m .s.n.m), los convierten en un patrimonio singular no sólo de los peruanos, sino de la humanidad entera.

Sin embargo, tales sitios se hallan en inminente peligro de ser destruidos por causa de la actividad minera. En el año 2005, varias empresas canadienses han iniciado prospecciones en la región. Las dos empresas más grandes se llaman Frontier Pacific y Vena Resources, que han formado consorcios con empresas más pequeñas. Sus lotes de exploración cubren casi la totalidad del territorio de las dos comunidades campesinas en los distritos de Macusani y Corani y con ello la gran mayoría (90%) de los sitios de arte rupestre de la zona. Esta situación ha merecido que la World Monument Fund haya considerado a tales sitios como uno de los monumentos mas amenazados del mundo en su última lista bianual.

Debe tenerse en cuenta que la zona comprendida por los distritos de Macusani y Corani, donde se conjuga este importante patrimonio cultural y un espectacular paisaje natural, constituye un patrimonio histórico y recurso económico permanente, cuyo aprovechamiento turístico y ambiental puede convertirse en un rubro económico que compensaría, a la larga y sobradamente, las explotaciones mineras.

Por lo expuesto, a ustedes solicitamos la protección y defensa de tan importante legado histórico por su condición de Patrimonio Cultural del Perú que pertenece a la Nación peruana. Su destrucción constituiría un grave atentado a nuestro patrimonio cultural.

Firmas:

Dr. Bernardino Ramírez Bautista
Decano de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, UNMSM

Dr. Waldemar Espinoza Soriano
Director del Postgrado de le Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, UNMSM

Dr. Román Robles Mendoza
Director Académico de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, UNMSM

Dr. Arturo Ruiz Estrada
Profesor Principal de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, UNMSM

David Durand Castro
Director Administrativo de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, UNMSM

Lic. Eduardo Vasquez Monge
Coordinador del Departamento Académico de Historia, UNMSM

Dr. Héctor Salazar Zapatero
Director del Instituto de Investigaciones Histórico Sociales, UNMSM

Antropólogo José Vegas Pozo
Director de la Escuela de Antropología, UNMSM

Fray Masias Cruz Reyes
Decano del Colegio de Geógrafos del Perú

Lic. Francisco Medina Sánchez
Profesor de Arqueología de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales

Dr. Hernan Amat Olazábal
Profesor Principal de Arqueología de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales

Alex Gonzales Panta
Secretario General del Centro de Estudiantes de Arqueología, UNMSM

Alfonso Enrique Estrada
Miembro del Consejo de la Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, UNMSM

Miguel Palacin Quispe
Presidente de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas CAOI (Ecuador, Bolivia, Argentina, Chile, Colombia y Perú)

Mario Palacios Panez
Presidente de la Confederación de Comunidades del Perú Afectadas por la Minería, CONACAMI

Zenón Vilca Turpo
Presidente CORECAMI-Puno

Lucio Calwaya P.
Unión de Comunidades Aymaras, UNCA

Josefina Sosa Condori
Sec. de la Mujer, CORECAMI-Puno

Juan Madueño N.
Presidente de CORECAMI-Moquegua

Pedro Vergaray Arista
Presidente de la Federación Provincial de Comunidades Campesinas de Luya, Amazonas

Rodrigo Ruiz Rubio
Asociación para la Defensa y Desarrollo de Kuelap, Amazonas

Lic. Mario Advincula Zeballos
Presidente del Instituto Cultural Runa


EN REUNION DE LIDERES RELIGIOSOS Y ORGANIZACIONES POR LA SALUD DE LA OROYA SE RECLAMÓ EL APORTE ETICO
NOTA DE PRENSA 18-07-07, Perú

Movimiento por la Salud de La Oroya/MOSAO y Mesa Técnica

Ayer en La Oroya, el Movimiento por la Salud de la Oroya (MOSAO) fue el anfitrión en una amplia reunión en la cual el monseñor Pedro Barreto, arzobispo de Huancayo, el pastor evangélico Rafael Goto y el pastor luterano reverendo Pedro Bullón compartieron su experiencia como miembros de la Delegación Interreligiosa que abogó en junio en el Perú y los Estados Unidos por la solución de la problemática ambiental de dicha ciudad. "El componente ético de la sociedad está siendo reclamado. El aporte ético debe darse ya, hemos llegado al tope máximo que no se puede aceptar", afirmó monseñor Barreto en dicha reunión.

Entre las organizaciones e instituciones presentes, además del MOSAO, estuvieron el Sindicato de Trabajadores Metalúrgicos de Doe Run Perú, la parroquia de La Oroya, la Mesa de Diálogo de la Región Junín, la Comisión Episcopal de Acción Social (CEAS), el proyecto El Mantaro Revive, la Asociación Civil Labor, la Red Uniendo Manos Contra la Pobreza Perú, CooperAcción y la Asociación Filomena Tomaira, entre otros concurrentes.

La Delegación Interreligiosa peruana, también conformada por la hermana dominica Adele Human y Elias Szczytnicki, judío ortodoxo laico, después de dialogar en Lima con Juan Carlos Huyhua, presidente de Doe Run Perú, y sus ejecutivos, buscó informar y sensibilizar a los ciudadanos norteamericanos respecto a la problemática ambiental y de salud que sufre la población de La Oroya. En San Luis, Missouri, y Nueva York la Delegación Interreligiosa peruana trabajó con organizaciones religiosas y civiles norteamericanas para lograr sus objetivos y tuvo presencia en importantes medios de comunicación, como Los Angeles Times, el semanario judío de izquierda Forward, la cadena de televisión pública nacional PBS, la cadena de TV de Missouri KMOV y el semanario nacional The Nation. Lamentablemente, como ya lo había anunciado Renco y Doe Run Company, fue imposible reunirse con el Sr. Ira Rennert, dueño de Renco, Doe Run Company y Doe Run Perú, y con Bruce Neil, presidente de Doe Run Company.

El reverendo Rafael Goto, presidente del Concilio Nacional Evangélico, expresó: "Nosotros consideramos que detrás de los empresarios hay valores y concepciones, y en el caso de Ira Rennert vemos a un creyente judío que tiene una escala de valores que se basa en su fe. Nos interesó tratar de hablar con él todo lo que significa el sentido de la vida, la responsabilidad social y humana". El representante de la Iglesia Luterana, Pedro Bullón, señaló: "La parte que le corresponde a la iglesia es la parte ética, nosotros no vemos la parte técnica ni la administrativa, eso es lo que nos vincula como iglesias a no solamente ver los desafíos, sino a decir que aquí estamos y es momento de unirnos en una causa común que es la lucha por la vida".

Por su parte, Rosa Amaro, presidenta del MOSAO, manifestó tras escuchar a los religiosos: "No estamos abandonados, pienso que los religiosos de diferentes creencias están con nosotros, solidarizándose con la problemática de La Oroya para que nosotros
podamos hacer algo frente a la contaminación y la salud que nos preocupa". Hernán Arias, representante del Sindicato de Trabajadores Metalúrgicos de La Oroya, declaró: "Sabemos que hay contaminación y que si no tomamos medidas drásticas nuestros niños van a sufrir las consecuencias, yo creo que la acción de los religiosos es un ejemplo y hay que solidarizarnos con ella".


CHILE

DECLARACION PÚBLICA CONJUNTA
OLCA, CHILE - MININGWATCH, CANADA

16 del julio de 2007

Controversial visita a Santiago realizará el Primer Ministro de Canadá: tiene tiempo para reunirse con Barrick Gold pero no para atender a las comunidades afectadas por las operaciones mineras canadienses.

El Primer Ministro Canadiense, Stephen Harper, realiza una visita a Chile para celebrar los 10 años de TLC entre ambas naciones. La sociedad civil chilena ha solicitado a la embajada canadiense una audiencia entre el Primer Ministro y las comunidades afectadas por las empresas mineras de ese país. La petición ha sido negada.

Según Joan Kuyek, Coordinadora Nacional de MiningWatch de Canadá, "Stephen Harper demuestra a los ciudadanos de las Américas que tiene una agenda sesgada a favor de las corporaciones. Su visita a Satiago incluye una reunión con Barrick Gold pero no con las comunidades afectadas por las operaciones de la misma".

La falta de preocupación, de parte del Primer Ministro, por los efectos negativos ocasionados por las inversiones mineras canadienses, es más desconcertante en el contexto del reciente proceso de consulta realizada por el gobierno canadiense la cual concluyó con un consenso sin precedente entre la industria y la sociedad civil canadiense: se acordó que el gobierno canadiense no debe promover o apoyar a las empresas que no cumplen con los principios internacionales de responsabilidad social, ambiental y de derechos humanos. Hace pocas semanas, en la ocasión de la cumbre del G8, Primer Ministro Harper destacó el valor de este proceso y su resultado.

Lucio Cuenca, del Observatorio Latinoamericao de Conflictos Ambientas (OLCA) afirma que: "Es inapropiado que el Primer Ministro se reúna y brinde su apoyo a la empresa, mientras el Congreso Chileno considera la necesidad de investigar supuestas irregularidades con su proyecto Pascua Lama, mientras el Consejo de Defensa del Estado en Chile analiza demandar a Barrick por destrucción de Glaciares y está pendiente una queja sobre el mismo frente a la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos."

Exigimos que el gobierno canadiense desista de promover y ayudar a las
empresas canadienses en tales condiciones.

Comunicaciones OLCA

Para mayor detalles, vease: www.olca.cl/oca/index.htm o www.miningwatch.ca

Contactos:

Lucio Cuenca, OLCA
l.cuenca@olca.cl

Dawn Paley, MiningWatch Canada
dawn@miningwatch.ca


Primer Ministro Canadiense entra a Oficina de Barrick por la puerta trasera

Santiago, 18 de Julio de 2007

www.olca.cl

Con dos horas de retraso y en medio de un gran despliegue de seguridad que incluía guardia, carabineros y fuerzas especiales, Stephen Harper llegó a las oficinas de Barrick Gold e ingresó por los estacionamientos, para eludir las manifestaciones ciudadanas que se apostaron desde las 8:00 de la mañana en la entrada del edificio.

El primer ministro de Canadá Stephen Harper, sigue sumando controversias en su paso por nuestro país. A la negativa de reunirse con las comunidades afectadas por la gran minería canadiense en Chile, sumó ayer las declaraciones en pleno palacio de la Moneda asegurando que "Barrick sigue las normas canadienses en materia de responsabilidad social de la empresa, y va a seguir todas las reglas en torno al proyecto"; y hoy, concretó su visita a las oficinas de Barrick, claro que tuvo que ingresar por la puerta trasera para eludir los lienzos y gritos que dan cuenta de que la empresa no cumple con los estándares prometidos.

Organizaciones canadienses nos han asegurado que este tipo de declaraciones son una burla, porque los estándares de responsabilidad social de las empresas, en Canadá aún están por definirse, o sea no existen. Harper se quedó en el lugar por alrededor de media hora, mientras los representantes de las comunidades leían una declaración que luego le hicieron llegar a Harper. Harper no la recibió pero sí la minera, que se comprometió a entregársela a la máxima autoridad canadiense. Para todos fue una sorpresa que una visita oficial de nuestro país haya tenido que entrar y salir por la puerta trasera, contra el tránsito y en una maniobra de seguridad más parecida al ocultamiento de un delincuente peligroso, que al cuidado de un personero de Estado.

Declaración entregada en Manifestación y Recibida por Barrick para entregar al Primer MInistro
Santiago, 18 de julio de 2007
DECLARACION PÚBLICA:

Primer Ministro de Canadá apoya a Minera Barick Gold y niega Audiencia a Comunidades afectadas por Pascua Lama

Ante esto, declaramos:

1. Es aberrante que Stephen Harper, bajo el pretexto de una visita de Estado, intervenga abierta y descaradamente en favor de una empresa minera cuestionada ambiental, legal, ética y socialmente.

2. Es inconcebible que la máxima autoridad de un país como Canadá, que desde el Estado promueve y ayuda a las inversiones mineras en el extranjero (con el dinero de todos y todas las canadienses), manifieste total desconsideración por los efectos que sus inversiones generan en las comunidades donde se desarrollan.

3. Nos parece preocupante que la agenda de Stephen Harper, contemple reunirse con la presidenta y con la cuestionada minera Barrick Gold, y se niegue a escuchar las voces ciudadanas que acusan muerte y destrucción luego de los 10 años de TLC entre ambos países. Lo que evidencia el doble estándar del primer ministro, que en su país abre mesas públicas sobre responsabilidad empresarial, mientras que aquí se niega a atender a la sociedad civil.

4. Rechazamos la presión política que supone esta visita, justo en momentos en que la minera Barrick enfrenta serias dificultades: El 21 de junio retrasó por cuarta vez la apertura de faenas; a mediados de Julio la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos determinará si acoge o no a tramitación la querella por usurpación territorial, levantada por la comunidad diaguita de los Huascoaltinos. Hace tres semanas la Cámara de Diputados manifestó su preocupación por las irregularidades denunciadas por la comunidad del Valle del Huasco y comprometió la creación de una comisión investigadora para el caso Pascua Lama. Próximamente el Consejo de Defensa del Estado determinará si hace parte acusadora en una querella que encabeza la comunidad, por irreparable daño ambiental referida a la destrucción de los glaciares. Aún no existe acuerdo entre Chile y Argentina por el tema de la tributación del proyecto Pascua Lama; además de una serie de otras irregularidades.

5. Por todo esto, declaramos desde ya al señor Harper como persona no grata, y exigimos al Gobierno de Chile que defienda nuestra soberanía y solicite a la repartición diplomática Canadiense explicaciones frente a las declaraciones y a la agenda de Harper, que muy poco ayudan a mantener la sanidad en las relaciones bilaterales de nuestros países.

Firman:

OLCA (Observatorio Latinoamericano de Conflictos Ambientales)
Colectivo Rexistencia
Movimiento Ciudadano Anti Pascualama
Programa Radial "Semillas de Agua"
Coordinadora de Defensa de los Valles del Tránsito y El carmen (Región de Atacama)
Casa Taller La Lucha
RAJAS, Santiago (Red de Acción por la Justicia Ambiental y Social)


ECUADOR

Explotación minera y conflictos con las comunidades en Ecuador

Por Jennifer Moore
ALAI, América Latina en Movimiento
4 de julio, 2007 - http://www.alainet.org

La posición del gobierno ecuatoriano respecto a la explotación minera a gran escala en el Ecuador ha sorprendido y preocupado a los sectores afectados. Los bloqueos de carreteras organizados por la "Coordinadora Nacional por la Defensa de la Vida y la Soberanía" la semana pasada enfrentaron una fuerte represión policial[1], de igual manera las nuevas declaraciones del gobierno están en contradicción con las demandas de las comunidades.

Si bien Ecuador ha sido un país productor de petróleo durante 40 años[2], nunca ha sido un productor minero importante. Sin embargo, las reformas legales que favorecen a la inversión privada y los estudios que revelan la riqueza de los depósitos minerales en los Andes ecuatorianos y en el sur de la región amazónica[3] han hecho que el país sea muy atractivo para los inversionistas extranjeras y en particular para los intereses canadienses[4]. Hasta la fecha, se han entregado más de 4.000 concesiones de explotación minera, cubriendo aproximadamente[5] el 20% del territorio, incluyendo muchas áreas, cultural y biológicamente diversas[6]. Toda vez, los proyectos actuales aún no inician la producción.

Las miles de personas que respondieron a la convocatoria de la Coordinadora Nacional por la Defensa de la Vida y la Soberanía están convencidas de que existen mejores alternativas para el futuro de sus comunidades y del país. En vista de que las comunidades afectadas ya están sufriendo los efectos de la división social[7], y conociendo del deterioro de la salud y el medio ambiente registrado en otros países[8], aspiran a que el Ecuador se eche para atrás y sea declarado "un país libre de la explotación minera a gran escala".

La Coordinadora Nacional por la Defensa de la Vida y la Soberanía

La Coordinadora Nacional por la Defensa de la Vida y la Soberanía se fundó el 26 de enero de 2007, congregando a comunidades de varias provincias del Ecuador, así como a organizaciones ambientalistas y de derechos humanos, asociaciones urbanas y a grupos de estudiantes. Lina Solano de la Coordinador Nacional dice que "los impactos sociales y ambientales de la minería a gran escala son muy significativos como para justificar que esta sea una importante fuente de ingresos para el país". De la experiencia ecuatoriana como productor de petróleo ella deduce que: "nosotros ya sabemos en donde serán gastadas las ganancias" refiriéndose a que una porción mínima beneficiará a las comunidades locales.

Sin embargo, para alcanzar tales beneficios, el gobierno debe plantear la reforma de la Ley de Minería, que establece el pago de una mínima patente de conservación por hectárea y el 0% de regalías[9]. En una reciente entrevista con Reuters, el Subsecretario de Minería, Jorge Jurado, indicó que el gobierno presentará un proyecto de reformas al Congreso en el transcurso de este mes, que, entre otros cambios, reintroducirá las regalías. El gobierno también ha dicho que creará un Ministerio de Minas (independiente del de Energía) y una empresa estatal de explotación minera[10].

Sin embargo, la Coordinadora Nacional exige que el gobierno suspenda los proyectos actuales e imponga una moratoria a las nuevas concesiones. Después de realizar investigaciones, también quiere anular las concesiones actuales, basándose en la Constitución del Ecuador, que garantiza el derecho de las comunidades a una consulta previa, justa e informada[11]. El Presidente y el Ministro de Energía y Minas anterior, Alberto Acosta, señalaron previamente que las demandas de las comunidades son justas y que la mayoría de concesiones actuales son inconstitucionales por esta misma razón.

El levantamiento nacional enfrenta la represión

Mientras los proyectos mineros se alistan a empezar la fase de explotación, la Coordinadora Nacional ha estado buscando la ayuda urgente del gobierno. Sin embargo, ante la falta de respuestas oportunas, declaró un paro nacional indefinido el 5 de junio. Las manifestaciones de la semana pasada obtuvieron una respuesta contundente, mas no la que anhelaban.

Los cierres de carreteras iniciados el día martes 26 bloquearon las más importantes arterias que rodean a Cuenca, capital de la provincia sureña del Azuay. Otras carreteras principales también fueron cerradas en las provincias de Morona Santiago y de Zamora Chinchipe, al sur de la Amazonía; también se realizaron manifestaciones en la provincia de Chimborazo.

El miércoles 27, el Presidente ordenó a la policía terminar con los bloqueos[12] e indicó que la "eliminación de las concesiones de explotación minera es inconcebible" dado los costos que implicaría para el Estado[13], negándose a dialogar con los manifestantes. La orden de emplear la fuerza policial dio lugar a una brutal represión contra los manifestantes en Azuay.

Centenares de policías emplearon cantidades abrumadoras de gases lacrimógenos y se movilizaron vehículos anti-motines para poner fin violentamente a los bloqueos, en los que participaban gente de todas las edades. Decenas de personas fueron detenidas, y varios manifestantes fueron heridos, al igual que algunos oficiales de policía. En Molleturo, los manifestantes reportaron la llegada de más de 400 soldados y de 150 oficiales de policía que despejaron las carreteras el viernes en la noche.

"Estamos increíblemente sorprendidos," dice Lina, "porque no pensamos que un gobierno comprometido con la defensa de nuestro país y de nuestra soberanía podría permitir eso".

Cabe anotar que varias comunidades de las provincias de Imbabura, de Pichincha, de Bolívar y de Cotopaxi, en ocasiones anteriores, ya han participado en manifestaciones similares. Por su parte, las organizaciones indígenas más importantes del Ecuador, la CONAIE y la ECUARUNARI, la semana pasada, emitieron declaraciones públicas en solidaridad con la lucha de los afectados por los proyectos mineros. [14]

Gobierno en conflicto con los intereses de la comunidad

El cambio de posición del gobierno genera preocupación. Lina Solano señala que el planteamiento del gobierno de que "la minería tiene que ser la fuente de subsistencia del país, luego de que el petróleo se agote, nos parece terrible, porque es tratar de negociar con nuestra vida, con la vida de miles de familias campesinas sobre todo, que van a estar afectadas por estos proyectos mineros".

El Subsecretario de Minería anunció la semana pasada que se conformará una Comisión de Alto Nivel para elaborar un informe en el plazo de 30 días referente al proyecto Quimsacocha. Éste es una gran iniciativa minera liderada por la empresa canadiense IAMGOLD, en la zona de Tarqui, donde hay una fuerte oposición.

Esto también es un "paso hacia atrás," según Lina. "Justamente el 26 de marzo cuando conversamos con el Presidente, él inmediatamente dio luz verde al entonces Ministro de Energía y Minas, Alberto Acosta, para que inicie lo que serían las auditorias exhaustivas de los proyectos"; pero el hecho de que se conforme la comisión no significa que se va a suspender el proyecto.

Reflexionando sobre los últimos cinco meses, Lina considera que la Coordinadora Nacional ha logrado generar una discusión nacional sobre el tema. Sin embargo, dice, que "si los otros sectores organizados y el resto de la población de Ecuador no reacciona frente a lo que está pasando lamentablemente no vamos a poder hacer frente" a este problema.


[1] El Mercurio – jueves 28 de junio de 2007
[2] Alberto Acosta, ibid.
[3] Acción Ecológica, "Conflictos y Resistencia Frente a la Actividad Minera" http://www.accionecologica.org/webae/images/2005/mineria/documentos/intro.pdf
[4] James O'Rourke, "Ecuador, Number One in Potential for Pipeline Ounces of Gold" Madison Avenue Research, 11 Apr 07; http://madisonaveresearch.com/ecuadorgold.htm
[5] El Comercio – martes 5 de junio de 2007
[6] Acción Ecológica, ibid.
[7] Eduardo Tamayo G., "Ecuador: Trasnacionales mineras a la ofensiva" ALAI, 15-dec-06; http://alainet.org/active/15025&lang=es
[8] See: Luis Vittor, "Cerro de Pasco y la expansión minera, un conflicto infinito" ALAI, 07-jun-06; http://www.alainet.org/active/17965 & Luis Vittor, "Conflictos mineros en los Andes" ALAI, 19-apr-07; http://www.alainet.org/active/17001%E2%8C%A9=es
[9] Acción Ecológica, ibid.
[10] Alonso Soto, "Ecuador plans to send Congress broad mining reforms" Reuters, Jun 22-07; http://www.reuters.com/article/bondsNews/idUSN2245561420070622
[11] Constitución Politica de la Republica del Ecuador, (aprobada el 5 de junio de 1998, por la Asamblea Nacional Constituyente), "Capítulo 5: De los derechos colectivos,"http://www.ecuanex.apc.org/constitucion/titulo03c.html#5
[12] El Mercurio – jueves 28 de junio de 2007
[13] Movimiento para la Salud de los Pueblos-Latinoamérica, Boletin de Prensa, "Paro por la Defensa de la Vida y la Soberania: No a las Transnacionales Mineras" 28-jun-07
[14] CONAIE (Confederación de Nacionalidades Indígenas del Ecuador), Boletín de Prensa, Quito, 29-jun-07; http://www.conaie.org/es/ge_comunicados/co20072906awa.html & ECUARUNARI (Confederación de los Pueblos de Nacionalidad Kichua del Ecuador), "Llamamos al Gobierno de Rafael Correa a no ser cómplice de las empresas mineras" Quito, 28-jun-07; http://www.ecuarunari.org/es/noticias/no_20070628.html


 

Home | About Us | Companies | Countries | Minerals | Contact Us
© Mines and Communities 2013. Web site by Zippy Info