MAC: Mines and Communities

NGOs call to halt BHP Billiton's Congo aluminium smelter

Published by MAC on 2010-12-21
Source: International Rivers Network (2010-12-16)

Fourteen African and other civil society organisations have called on BHP Billiton to halt its plans to construct a US$5 billion aluminum smelter, and co-fund a $3.5 billion hydropower project, in Democratic Republic of Congo.

According to Terri Hathaway of International Rivers: "One of the world's richest corporations is jumping the development queue ahead of some of the world's poorest people. BHP Billiton's flagrant disregard for the consequences of this venture is alarming."

NGOs Call for a Moratorium on BHP Billiton's Congo Smelter

International Rivers Press Release

16 December 2010

International civil society groups have called on BHP Billiton to halt its plans for a US$5 billion aluminum smelter and the associated $3.5 billion Inga 3 hydropower scheme in Democratic Republic of Congo, one of the world's most corrupt and under-developed countries. The proposed smelter would consume 2,500 MW of electricity, more than DR Congo's entire current power supply.

In a letter to the chairman of BHP Billiton, 14 African and international organizations urged the corporation to impose a moratorium on the project until the Congolese government first fulfills its commitments to bring electricity to its citizens.

An estimated 62 million Congolese people - 94% of the population - do not have access to electricity. The Congolese government has set an aggressive goal to increase electrification rates ten-fold within 15 years (to 60% by 2025), but has yet to explain how it intends to achieve this target. By focusing the Congolese energy sector's attention on developing Inga 3, BHP Billiton could derail the country's efforts toward achieving its electrification goals - and thus damage its poverty eradication efforts.

Daily power outages plague those few who are connected to the state's dilapidated power grid. Despite available funding, an urgent rehabilitation of the grid has languished since 2003 with little explanation.

The letter warns about the project's misleading economic benefits. The proposed smelter would create very few jobs relative to the electricity it would consume. Undisclosed power and investment contracts are expected to cost the Congolese people by giving undue preference to BHP Billiton. Examples from elsewhere in Africa are revealing: terms of BHP Billiton's long-standing smelter deals in southern Africa sent shockwaves through the region in April when they were publicly disclosed.

Says Terri Hathaway of International Rivers: "One of the world's richest corporations is jumping the development queue ahead of some of the world's poorest people. BHP Billiton's flagrant disregard for the consequences of this venture is alarming."

The NGOs' proposed moratorium would halt BHP Billiton's involvement in the Inga 3 hydropower scheme until the rehabilitation of the poorly performing Inga 1 and Inga 2 dams has been successfully completed and the government has prepared an action plan to achieve its electricity access target.

It would also call on BHP Billiton to refrain from any financial agreements for Inga 3 or the proposed aluminum smelter until the Congolese power sector has demonstrated at least two years of successful, post-rehabilitation financial and technical operation.

Read the NGO letter to BHP Billiton: http://www.internationalrivers.org/en/node/6058 [also below]

International Rivers is an environmental and human rights organization with staff in four continents. For over two decades, International Rivers has been at the heart of the global struggle to protect rivers and the rights of communities that depend on them.

Contact:
Terri Hathaway, Africa Program Director
(cell in Cameroon) +237 70 49 14 06


Call for BHP Billiton to Halt Congo Smelter, Inga 3

15 December 2010

Mr. Jac Nasser
Chairman
BHP Billiton Limited and BHP Billiton Plc

RE: Proposed BHP Billiton smelter and Inga 3 in Democratic Republic of Congo

Dear Mr. Nasser,

We wish to bring your attention to the adverse impacts of BHP Billiton's ongoing negotiations with the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) for a $5 billion aluminum smelter near the port of Banana on the Atlantic Coast to be powered by the proposed Inga 3 hydropower scheme. In one of the world's poorest and most corrupt countries, this purely commercial venture is set to reinforce existing poverty. Without due action, it will cost the Congolese people electricity, jobs and development.

Project History

In February 2006, BHP Billiton signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Congolese government to develop a massive aluminum smelter, now valued at $5 billion, in Bas Congo Province. The smelter would produce 800,000 tonnes of aluminum per year and consume 2,500 MW of electricity. Prerequisites for the smelter's construction include the availability of electricity from the $3.5 billion, proposed Inga 3 hydro scheme and construction of a $500 million deep sea port. In 2007, BHP Billiton agreed to finance a feasibility study for the 4,500 MW Inga 3 project. The Banana deep sea port may be constructed as part of an infrastructure-minerals deal now under discussion between the governments of DRC and South Korea.

The MoU between BHP Billiton and the Congolese government conflicted with the DRC's pre-existing Westcor agreement - signed in 2004 - to develop and equitably share Inga 3 power with four other African countries. It appears that BHP Billiton negotiated the proposed smelter, despite the conflict it would cause over electricity supplies. BHP Billiton's interests led to Westcor's eventual cancelation of the Inga 3 project, resulting in strained relationships between the Congolese government and other Westcor member governments. BHP Billiton's behavior raises concerns that the corporation may advance its interests in Inga 3 and the aluminum smelter at any cost.

Consequences to the Power Sector

Just 6% of Congolese people have access to electricity, representing one of the world's lowest access rates. The Congolese government has set a goal to increase access to electricity to 60% of its population by 2025. But development of Inga 3 does not actively support this goal, and would likely derail any progress toward that goal. Capital investments required for Inga 3 would reduce government resources for smaller, hydropower dams in areas currently not electrified. Excess power from Inga 3 may be delivered to Kinshasa, Katanga's mining industry or even to South Africa, but it won't improve DRC's access rate. Without a clear government plan for reaching DRC's access to energy target (60% by 2025), BHP Billiton's negotiations will adversely influence the much-needed expansion of national power distribution.

Current efforts to rehabilitate the Congolese power grid, namely the Inga 1 and Inga 2 dams adjacent to the proposed Inga 3 site, have stalled. The situation is likely the result of limited government interest to effectively execute the rehabilitation for the public good. Corrupt systems within government are also expected to be causing delays and concerns about financial accountability. By continuing to advance the Inga 3 project in spite of the Congolese government's poor track record to rehabilitate the national power supply, BHP Billiton is demonstrating its own disregard for the Congolese people.

Consequences to Development

Aluminum smelters create some of the most energy-intensive jobs in the world. BHP Billiton suggests that the new smelter would create 1,200 permanent jobs and require 1,600 sub-contractors, representing an astounding 4,286 MWh of consumed electricity per job/sub-contract. While these jobs and local sub-contracts are important, they come at the opportunity cost of similar investments which could create more jobs and local development. Attracting a variety of manufacturing and processing industries to the region could create far more jobs, spurring the local economy while consuming the same amount of, or even less, electricity.

Aluminum smelters also pay some of the world's lowest electricity tariffs. Other electricity consumers, especially Congolese households, are at risk of paying higher power tariffs to offset the disproportionately low tariffs BHP Billiton is expected to negotiate.

In order to justify low power tariffs and energy-intensive job creation in a country with such low energy access rates and high unemployment, other economic and financial benefits are expected to offset the opportunity cost. However, investment contracts commonly reduce tax burdens and royalty rates paid to the state. Indirect economic benefits, such as indirect job creation, can also be misleading as they would likely accompany investments in other new industries as well.

Without transparency in investment and power sales contracts between BHP Billiton and the Congolese government, these contracts are expected to provide preferential terms to BHP Billiton, at a cost to the Congolese people through unearned state revenues and subsequent state development projects.

Recommendations

Given these factors, we fear that BHP Billiton's commercial plans to develop its massive Congolese aluminum smelter using Inga 3 power will come at an unacceptably high cost to Congolese citizens. We ask BHP Billiton to work in partnership for the development of the Congolese people by taking the following steps:

We understand that BHP Billiton takes its commitment to sustainable development very seriously. We ask that you take these outlined actions in the spirit of those commitments. Without these actions, profits made by BHP Billiton from these investments would undermine the development of Congolese people. We look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

Jean Claude Katende
ASADHO - African Association for the Defense of Human Rights (DRC)

Claude Kabemba
Southern Africa Resource Watch (South Africa)

Nondo E. Ejano
Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights (Tanzania/Philippines)

Anabela Lemos
Justiça Ambiental! Friends of the Earth- Mozambique

Bobby Peek
groundWork, Friends of the Earth - South Africa

Natalie Lowrey
Friends of the Earth - Australia

Geoff Nettleton
Indigenous Peoples Links (UK)

Anders Lustgarten
CounterBalance (EU)

Nick Hildyard
The Corner House UK

Maurice Carney
Friends of the Congo (US)

Jan Cappelle
Capacity for Development (Belgium)

Terri Hathaway and Lori Pottinger
International Rivers (US)

Richard Solly
London Mining Network (UK)

Knud Vöcking
Urgewald e.V. (Germany)

Cc

Mr. Ian Wood
Vice President Sustainable Development
BHP Billiton

Dr. Xolani Mkhwanazi
President and Chief Operations Officer, Aluminium South Africa
BHP Billiton


Appel à BHP Billiton pour stopper la fonderie congolaise, Inga 3

Decembre 15, 2010

M. Jac Nasser
Président de BHP Billiton Limited et de BHP Billiton Plc

OBJET: Fonderie d'aluminium BHP Billiton et projet Inga 3 proposés en République Démocratique du Congo

M. Nasser,

Nous souhaitons attirer votre attention sur les impacts négatifs des négociations que BHP Billiton mènent actuellement avec le gouvernement de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) concernant une fonderie d'aluminium de 5 milliards $ près du port de Banana sur la côte Atlantique qui sera alimentée par le projet Inga 3 proposé. Dans l'un des pays les plus pauvres et les plus corrompus du monde, tout laisse à croire que cette entreprise purement commerciale ne va faire qu'accentuer la pauvreté existante. Sans une intervention appropriée, cette entreprise privera le peuple congolais d'électricité, d'emplois et de développement.

Historique du projet

En février 2006, BHP Billiton a signé un Protocole d'Entente (PE) avec le gouvernement congolais pour développer une gigantesque fonderie d'aluminium, qui est maintenant estimée à 5 milliards $, dans la Province du Bas Congo. Cette fonderie produirait 800,000 tonnes d'aluminium par an et consommerait 2,500 MW d'électricité. Les conditions préalables pour la construction d'une fonderie incluent la disponibilité de l'électricité produite par le projet hydraulique Inga 3 proposé de 3.5 milliards $ et la construction d'un port de haute mer de 500 millions $. En 2007, BHP Billiton a accepté de financer une étude de faisabilité pour le projet Inga 3 de 4,500 MW. Le port de haute mer de Banana pourrait être construit dans le cadre d'un accord infrastructure/minéraux qui est en cours de discussion entre les gouvernements de la RDC et de la Corée du Sud.

Le PE entre BHP Billiton et le gouvernement congolais était en contradiction avec l'accord Westcor préexistant signé par la RDC en 2004, pour développer et partager équitablement l'électricité produite par Inga 3 avec quatre autres pays africains. Il semble que BHP Billiton ait négocié la fonderie proposée en dépit du litige que cela causerait au sujet de l'alimentation électrique. Les intérêts de BHP Billiton ont conduit, au bout du compte, Westcor à annuler le projet Inga 3, ce qui a entraîné une détérioration des relations entre le gouvernement congolais et d'autres gouvernements membres de Westcor. Le comportement de BHP Billiton a laissé pensé que la société pourrait faire valoir ses intérêts dans Inga 3 et la fonderie d'aluminium à n'importe quel prix.

Conséquences sur le secteur de l'énergie électrique

Seuls 6% du peuple congolais ont accès à l'électricité, ce qui représente l'un des taux d'accès les plus bas au monde. Le gouvernement congolais s'est fixé l'objectif d'augmenter l'accès à l'électricité à 60% de sa population d'ici 2025. Cependant, le développement d'Inga 3 ne soutient pas activement cet objectif, et ferait probablement même déraillé toute tentative de réalisation de cet objectif. Les dépenses d'investissement requises pour Inga 3 réduiraient les ressources du gouvernement destinées à des barrages hydroélectriques plus petits dans des zones qui ne sont actuellement pas électrifiées. L'excédent d'électricité produit par Inga 3 pourrait être exporté vers Kinshasa, l'industrie minière du Katanga ou même l'Afrique du Sud, mais cela n'améliorera en rien le taux d'accès à l'électricité de la RDC. Sans un plan gouvernemental clair pour atteindre le taux d'accès à l'électricité visé par la RDC (60% d'ici 2025), les négociations de BHP Billiton auront une influence négative sur l'élargissement indispensable du réseau de distribution électrique national.

Les efforts actuels entrepris pour réhabiliter le réseau électrique congolais, à savoir les barrages Inga 1 et Inga 2 situés à proximité du site proposé d'Inga 3, sont bloqués. Cette situation est sans doute le résultat de manque d'intérêt du gouvernement pour exécuter efficacement le plan de réhabilitation au profit du public congolais. Les systèmes corrompus au sein du gouvernement pourraient aussi provoquer des retards et susciter des préoccupations en matière de responsabilité financière. En continuant à développer le projet Inga 3 en dépit du manque d'aptitude du gouvernement congolais à réhabiliter le réseau électrique national, BHP Billiton affiche son indifférence à l'égard du peuple congolais.

Conséquences sur le développement

Les fonderies d'aluminium créent quelques uns des emplois ayant la plus forte intensité d'énergie au monde. D'après BHP Billiton, la nouvelle fonderie créerait 1 200 emplois permanents et nécessiterait 1 600 sous-traitants, ce qui représenterait 4 286 MWh d'électricité consommée par emploi/sous-traitant, ce qui est un chiffre exorbitant. Bien que ces emplois et sous-traitants locaux soient importants, ils représentent un coût d'option d'investissements similaires qui pourraient créer davantage d'emplois et stimuler le développement local. Le fait d'attirer une variété d'industries de fabrication et de transformation dans la région pourrait créer un nombre bien plus élevé d'emplois, stimuler l'économie locale tout en consommant la même quantité d'électricité, voire une quantité inférieure.

Les fonderies d'aluminium payent aussi les tarifs d'électricité les plus bas au monde. D'autres consommateurs d'électricité, en particulier les ménages congolais, courent le risque de payer des tarifs d'électricité plus élevés pour compenser les tarifs disproportionnellement faibles que BHP Billiton devrait négocier.

Pour justifier les bas tarifs d'électricité et la création d'emploi à forte intensité d'énergie dans un pays possédant des taux d'accès à l'énergie aussi bas et un chômage aussi élevé, il est probable que d'autres avantages économiques et financiers devront compenser le coût d'option. Cependant, les contrats d'investissement réduisent en général les fardeaux fiscaux et les taux des redevances versées à l'État. Les avantages économiques indirects, tels que la création d'emplois indirects, peuvent aussi s'avérer trompeurs car ils accompagneraient probablement aussi des investissements dans d'autres industries nouvelles.

Sans transparence dans les contrats d'investissement et de vente d'électricité entre BHP Billiton et le gouvernement congolais, il est probable que ces contrats accorderont des modalités préférentielles à BHP Billiton, aux dépens du peuple congolais qui seront lésés en termes de revenus non perçus par l'État et de projets de développement ultérieurs.

Recommandations

Compte tenu de ces facteurs, nous craignons que les plans commerciaux de BHP Billiton visant à développer sa gigantesque fonderie d'aluminium en utilisant l'électricité produite par Inga 3 représentent un coût beaucoup trop cher pour les citoyens congolais. Nous demandons à BHP Billiton de collaborer au développement du peuple congolais en prenant les mesures suivantes:

Veuillez agréer, Monsieur Nasser, l'expression de nos sentiments distingués.

Cordialement,

Jean Claude Katende
ASADHO - African Association for the Defense of Human Rights (DRC)

Claude Kabemba
Southern Africa Resource Watch (South Africa)

Nondo E. Ejano
Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights (Tanzania/Philippines)

Anabela Lemos
Justiça Ambiental! Friends of the Earth- Mozambique

Bobby Peek
groundWork, Friends of the Earth - South Africa

Natalie Lowrey
Friends of the Earth - Australia

Geoff Nettleton
Indigenous Peoples Links (UK)

Anders Lustgarten
CounterBalance (EU)

Nick Hildyard
The Corner House UK

Maurice Carney
Friends of the Congo (US)

Jan Cappelle
Capacity for Development (Belgium)

Terri Hathaway and Lori Pottinger
International Rivers (US)

Richard Solly
London Mining Network (UK)

Knud Vöcking
Urgewald e.V. (Germany)

 

Home | About Us | Companies | Countries | Minerals | Contact Us
© Mines and Communities 2013. Web site by Zippy Info