MAC: Mines and Communities

Africans call for urgent mining reforms

Published by MAC on 2010-08-02
Source: AIMES (2010-07-08)

Following a recent African conference, a substantial number of organisations, supported by their overseas colleagues, are calling for "the promotion and protection of community rights, the environment, and realisation of the aspirations of African peoples" impacted by mining.

Their demands include a "review of mining contracts to make them fair, transparent, equitable and to optimise their contribution to national development".

They also urge the "upward review of royalty tax and state equity participation", and for a "specific percentage of [a] super tax to be devoted for implementation of the continental reform agenda".

Moreover, they say, environmental and social impact assessments must now "take account of issues such as human rights, gender, housing and access to livelihood".

French version here /  Version en français ici

 

ESPAÑOL

12th ANNUAL STRATEGY MEETING OF THE AFRICAN INITIATIVE ON MINING, ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY (AIMES)

6-8 July, 2010

Bamoko, Mali

1.0 Introduction

We, members of the African Initiative on Mining, Environment and Society (AIMES) from Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa and Zimbabwe and our partners from Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States of America held its twelfth Annual Strategy Meeting from July 6-8th, 2010 in Bamako, Mali.

2.0 Context and Purpose

The 12th annual strategy meeting took place at a time of global financial crisis affecting the economies of mineral dependent countries. The countries which unleashed the financial shock waves into Africa's economy have begun to put forward recovery measures. This is a period during which the continent, under the aegis of the African Union, is embarking on reforms of Africa's mining regimes. Both the financial crisis and the recovery measures have consequences for Africa's development effort in general and the reform agenda in particular.

Conceived as a platform for analysis, information sharing and shared policy positions, the objective of the twelfth annual strategy meeting was to:

1. Deepen our understanding of and capacity in relation to the financial crisis, the continental reform agenda as well as other policy initiatives relevant to Africa's mining sector.

2. Develop joint analysis of the implications of the financial crisis, the recovery effort and policy initiatives for Africa's policy reform agenda and the campaigning possibilities for CSOs.

3. Adopt a plan and strategy for influencing the adoption of positions and outcomes of the meeting.

4. Offer solidarity and make a contribution to national campaigns promoted by Malian civil society organisations on mining.

5. Provide space for shared perspectives and strengthening networking relations.

3.0 Issues

The meeting discussed:

· The financial crisis and the current recovery effort, international commodity trading, and international financing recourse for the global mining industry and their impacts and implications for mineral dependent economies in Africa.

· The issues and challenges to the continental agenda for the reforms of Africa's mining regimes as well as other on-going policy initiatives relevant for Africa's mining sector and their implications for the reform agenda.

· The sites and arenas of policy initiatives, contestations and advocacy, in particular, the Multilateral Development Banks, the African Development Bank, The African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights and the national policy space.

· Strategies and the role of AIMES as a Pan-African civil society network for collaborative advocacy on mining

4.0 Observations

Based on shared analysis and understanding of the issues discussed the meeting made the following observations:

The financial crisis has inflicted devastating effects on the economies of African countries through job losses, collapse of businesses, and loss of government revenues from selected minerals, in particular copper and diamond.

The financial and economic crises exposed the inherent weakness of the structure of Africa's economies and their over-dependence on a narrow basket of primary commodities. At the same time, the crisis has exposed the flaws of neo-liberal economic model.

Unfortunately, while the flaws of neo-liberalism have re-introduced the debate on regulations, much of the discussions on regulation tend to focus on financial regulation and ignore any discussion on the financialisation of primary commodities.

We observed that African governments are turning up to the International Financial Institutions, in particular the IMF and the World Bank for a solution to the financial crisis. Rather than financial aid, the financial crisis brought to the fore the urgent need for a re-exanimation of the primary commodity trading regimes and the structure of the economy of mineral dependent African countries.

We observed the appalling attitude of the World Bank towards the concerns of the public and citizens, especially people affected by the Banks supported mining projects. The failure of the World Bank Group to; acknowledge failures of Structural Adjustment Programme, and incorporate constructive response to the Extractive Industries Review into its policies and practice, is a reflection of its lack of sensitivity to citizens concerns.

A decade ago, African policymakers rejected suggestions of any alternative to the current liberalised Africa's mining regimes even when it was clear that the unsustainable extraction of Africa's rich mineral resources has not been to the benefit of local communities, host countries and the continent as a whole. On that score, we find the on-going reform initiative by the African Union an affirmation of the failure of the mining regimes and a bold step that should be supported to succeed.

However, we are concerned that the future prospects of the continental reform initiative may be undermined by parallel processes such as the World Bank sponsored African Mineral Governance Programme (AMGP) and other regional specific initiatives. Our concern is grounded on the history of past experiences in which external policy prescription has led to the collapse of domestic as well as continental policy initiative. A clear example is the way in which Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAP) came to replace the Lagos Plan of Action adopted by African governments in the 1980s. While African governments may still have the spirit of the Lagos Plan of Action, the demands of liberalisation and commitment to specific projects is making it almost impossible for them to rally around a continental development project.

The failure and or lack of domestic policy is also a reflection of the appalling attitude of African leaders towards a united continental development initiative. Over the past decades, there has been a tendency on the part of African governments, negotiators and elites to prioritise externally prescribed policies and donor funded projects over domestic policy initiatives and resource mobilisation. This partly explains why domestic policies often prioritise foreign direct investment over and above rural economic activity, peasant producers, small scale artisanal mining and the informal sector as a whole.

In the midst of on-going policy initiatives at the national, regional, continental and international levels we observed a continuing environmental degradation and violation of the human rights of people living in mining areas. Environmental destruction and human rights violations caused by mining activities manifest in various forms including water pollution, destruction of livelihoods of men and women, land degradation and interruption of land relations, forced eviction, meagre compensation, unemployment, public health and safety issues, encroachment in protected areas, and general lack of developmental impacts in communities affected by mining.

The current mining regimes provide too many privileges for transnational mining companies which enable capital flight out of the continent. These privileges come in various forms including unrestricted access and control of mineral resources, tax concessions, low State equity participation, long years of mining leases, pervasive contracts and bilateral investment agreements, voluntary reporting mechanisms. These privileges constitute an important component of the poor balance sheet of mining for Africa. The situation is compounded by the poor information exchange and weak institutional capacity to monitor and prevent tax evasion and avoidance, environmental and human rights abuses.

5.0 Demands/Recommendations

Based on the forgoing we make the following proposals for ensuring success of the reform agenda, protecting African economies from devastating effects of financial crisis, and the protection of the environment and community rights.

Financial crisis

· We support the calls for reform and regulation of the international financial system.

· Since the financial and economic crises has highlighted Africa's vulnerability with particular regard to mineral and other primary commodity dependence, we demand that the current debate on reform and regulation of the international financial system should pay attention to the effects of financial speculation on mineral dependent economies and options for protecting such economies.

· As part of contributing to fair commodity trading regimes, we call for urgent action to develop frameworks for production and price stabilization and management of Africa's strategic commodities. This approach also enhances economic and political cooperation among mineral dependent developing countries.

· In addition, there should be short-to-medium and long-term actions and measures for value-addition through processing and manufacturing.

Continental Policy Reform Agenda

· We find the on-going reform initiative led by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) under the directive of the African Union (AU) an affirmation of the failure of the mining regimes and a bold step that should be supported to succeed.

· We call for wider access and improvement around the reform process to allow a reflection of a variety of perspectives as much as is democratically possible.

· We call for coherence and harmonisation of the on-going policy initiatives on the continent with the view to optimising the benefits of mining to Africa and its people in both the short and long-term. In this regard, the frameworks which emerge from on-going reform initiatives must focus on the developmental role of mining, a convergence of the social, cultural, economic, environmental and political objectives including the need to improve human development, indigenous knowledge and technology, gender and generational equity.

· The processes of the reform, coherence and harmonisation should provide opportunity for exploring and putting forward policy options that go beyond the familiar centrality of foreign direct investment in Africa as a whole and in the mining sector in particular.

· We call for united action in opposition to any threat to the philosophical basis and overall success of the reform that offers frameworks which protect community interest and the environment as well as promote economic development and citizenship culture in a determination of mining.

We repeat our demands for:

· An end to impunity and violation of community rights and the environment

· Review of mining contracts to make them fair, transparent, equitable and optimise their contribution to national development.

· An upward review of royalty tax and state equity participation.

· An introduction of specific taxes such as capital gain tax, windfall tax, and super tax. A specific percentage of the supper tax could be devoted for implementation of the continental reform agenda.

· Review of the framework and administration of the environmental and social impact assessment to take account of issues such as human rights, gender, housing and access to livelihood.

· Abrogation of clauses of stability agreement, development agreement and confidentiality of environmental audit reports from national codes as these constitute major barriers to state autonomy and public access to information.

· Transparency and accountability of public institutions and mining companies, particularly in their relations with communities and citizens' groups, as well as their obligations to environmental, human rights, finance and tax.

6.0 Conclusion

We concluded the meeting knowing that the reform initiative is a contested arena but with high hope that African governments and leaders would be united around the African Mining Vision and in their pursuit of the reform initiative in a way that addresses the needs and imperatives of African peoples and their economies, and in the same spirit united in their opposition to any threat to derail or re-shape the reform in the narrow pursuit of the interest of corporations and a few privileged elites.

We as African Civil Society in collaboration with partners are committed conscious of the diversity capacity differentials commit ourselves to ourselves to continue to work together for the promotion and protection of community rights, the environment and the realisation of the aspirations of African peoples. We call upon other organisations, especially the academic community, the media, women's groups, labour and human rights activists across Africa and beyond to join AIMES in this endeavour.

Endorsed by

1. Mamadou GOÏTA
Directeur Exécutif IRPAD/Afrique
Mali

2. Abu A. Brima
Executive Director
Network Movement for Justice and Development (NMJD)

3. Alvin Mosioma
Coordinator
Tax Justice Network for Africa (TJN-A)

4. Mohammed S. Turay
Programme Officer
Network Movement for Justice and Development (NMJD)

5. Roger Moody
Mines and Communities

6. Wilson Kipsang Kipkazi
Secretary/Programmes Director
Endoris Welfare Council

7. Kabinet Cisse
Change de Programme Resource Naturelle
Guinea

7. Mamadou Diaby
Community Representative
Guinea

9. Idrisa Sako
Journalist, Les Echoes

10. Caroline Ntaopane
Mining Programme Officer
Bench Marks, Johannesburg, South Africa

11. Richard Adjei-Poku
Executive Director
Livelihood & Environment Ghana (LEG)

12. Jamie Kneen
Communications & Outreach Coordinator
Miningwatch, Canada

13. Jean-Luc Muke
Member, Avocats Verts Org
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

14. Joshua Klemm
Program Associate, Africa
Bank Information Center

15. Mawutor Samuel
Ghana

16. Abdulai Darimani
Third World Network - Africa

17. Lindlyn Tamufor
Ghana

18. Yao Graham
Coordinator
Third World Network - Africa

19. Barbara Zida Kpodo
Programme Officer
Third World Network - Africa

20. Gilbert Makore
Zimbabwe Environmental Law Association (ZELA)
Zimbabwe

21. Gertrude Frimpomaa Domfeh
Coalitions and Partnerships Officer
ABANTU for Development, Ghana

22. Kanni Abdoulaye
GREN Niger

23. Hamadataher Haroun Moussa
GREN Niger

24. Van Edig Christopu
Niger

25. Nouhoum Keita
Community representative, Mali

26. Prince Chima Williams
Environmental Rights Action/ OilWatch-Africa

27. Fatoumata Traore
Mali

28. Assetou Samake
Researcher, Mali


DECLARATION - DOUZIEME REUNION ANNUELLE DE STRATEGIE DE L'INITIATIVE AFRICAINE SUR L'EXPLOITATION MINIERE, L'ENVIRONNEMENT ET LA SOCIETE (AIMES)

6-8 Juillet 2010

Bamoko, Mali

1.0 Introduction

Nous, vingt membres de l'Initiative Africaine sur l'Exploitation Minière, l'Environnement et la Société venant de la République Démocratique du Congo, du Ghana, de la Guinée, du Kenya, du Mali, du Niger, du Nigeria, de la Sierra Leone, de l'Afrique du Sud, du Zimbabwe et nos partenaires du Canada, du Royaume Uni et des Etats-Unis, nous sommes réunis dans le cadre de notre douzième réunion annuelle de stratégie du 6 au 8 juillet 2010 à Bamako au Mali.

2.0 Contexte et Objectifs

La douzième réunion annuelle de stratégie s'est déroulée à un moment où la crise financière touche de plein fouet les pays tributaires des ressources minières. Les pays qui sont à l'origine de cette vague de crise financière ont commencé à prendre des mesures en faveur d'une relance du secteur financier. Entretemps, le continent sous l'égide de l'Union Africaine a lancé un programme de réforme des régimes miniers en Afrique. La crise financière et les mesures de relance ont tous des conséquences sur les efforts de développement de l'Afrique en général et l'agenda de la réforme en particulier.

Conçue comme une plateforme d'analyse, d'échange d'information et de partage des positions de politique, la douzième réunion a pour objectif de:

1. Approfondir notre compréhension de la crise financière, de l'agenda de la réforme continentale, ainsi que d'autres initiatives pertinentes dans le secteur minier de l'Afrique;

2. Faire une analyse commune des implications de la crise financière, l'effort de la relance et des initiatives de l'Agenda africain de reforme des politiques et les possibilités de campagne pour les OSC;

3. Adopter un plan et une stratégie pour permettre la prise en compte des positions et des résultats de la réunion;

4. Faire preuve de solidarité et apporter une contribution aux campagnes de la société civile malienne sur l'exploitation minière;

5. Offrir un espace pour l'échange des perspectives et le renforcement des liens de réseautage.

3.0 Les questions

La réunion a délibéré sur:
· La crise financière et les efforts actuels de relance, le commerce international des produits de base, le recours au financement international dans l'industrie minière mondiale et leurs impacts sur les économies tributaires des ressources minières en Afrique;

· Les questions et les défis qui se posent à l'agenda de réforme des régimes miniers en Afrique ainsi que d'autres initiatives de politique relatives au secteur minier africain en cours et leurs implications pour l'agenda de réforme;

· Les sites et arènes des initiatives de politique, des contestations, et de plaidoyer, en particulier, les Banques multilatérales de Développement, la Banque Africaine de Développement, la Commission africaine des droits de l'homme et des peuples et l'espace nationale de politique;

· Les stratégies et le rôle de AIMES en tant que réseau panafricain de plaidoyer collaboratif sur l'exploitation minière.

4.0 Constatations

Partant de l'analyse et de la compréhension commune des questions discutées lors de la réunion nous avons fait les constatations suivantes:

La crise financière a eu des effets dévastateurs sur les économies des pays africains, notamment la perte des emplois, la faillite des entreprises, la réduction des recettes provenant de quelques minerais, en particulier le cuivre et le diamant.

La crise financière a exposé les faiblesses inhérentes à la structure des économies africaines et leur dépendance excessive d'un panier restreint de produit de base. La crise a également fait ressortir les failles du modèle économique néolibérale.

Malheureusement, bien que les failles du néolibéralisme aient suscité à nouveau le débat sur la réglementation, les discussions sur la régulation ont tendance à se focaliser sur la régulation financière et passent sous silence la financiarisation des produits de base.

Nous avons noté que les gouvernements africains se tournent vers les institutions financières internationales, en particulier le FMI et la Banque mondiale pour une solution à la crise financière. Au lieu de l'aide financière, la crise la crise financière a fait ressortir la nécessité urgente de réexaminer les régimes de commercialisation des produits de base et la structure des économies des pays africains tributaires des ressources minières.

Nous avons observé l'attitude consternante de la Banque mondiale envers le public et les citoyens surtout les populations touchées par les projets miniers soutenus par la Banque. L'incapacité du Groupe de la Banque mondiale d'admettre l'échec du Programme d'ajustement structurel et d'inclure des réponses constructives à la revue des industries extractives dans ses politiques et pratiques est un reflet de son indifférence vis-à-vis les préoccupations des citoyens.

Il y a deux décennies, les décideurs africains rejetaient des alternatives aux régimes miniers libéraux actuellement en vigueur en Afrique, bien qu'il soit évident que l'extraction peu durable des ressources minières du continent africain n'était pas favorable aux communautés hôtes, aux pays et au continent en général. A cet effet, nous considérons l'initiative de réforme par l'Union Africaine comme une mesure audacieuse et une affirmation de l'échec des régimes miniers actuels. Il faudra donc soutenir cette initiative pour qu'elle aboutisse.

Cependant, nous sommes préoccupés qu'il est possible que la réforme continentale soit mise en danger par des processus parallèles tels que le Programme de Gouvernance des Minerais Africains sponsorisés par la Banque mondiale et d'autres initiatives spécifiques régionales. Nos préoccupations sont fondées sur les expériences passées suivant lesquels les prescriptions politiques externes ont entrainé l'échec des initiatives de politique internes et continentales. Un exemple concret est la manière dont le Programme d'Ajustement Structurel (PAS) a remplacé le Plan d'Action de Lagos adopté par les gouvernements africains dans les années 1980. Bien que les gouvernements africains soient toujours animés de l'esprit du Plan d'Action de Lagos, les exigences de la libéralisation et l'engagement envers de projets spécifiques les empêchent de soutenir des projets de développement continental.

L'échec ou le manque de politique interne reflète l'attitude épouvantable envers les initiatives de développement continentales. Au cours des dernières décennies, les gouvernements, les négociateurs et l'élite africains ont tendance à accorder la priorité aux prescriptions politiques externes et financés par les donateurs par rapport aux initiatives internes et la mobilisation des ressources locales. Ceci explique, en partie, les raisons pour lesquelles les politiques internes accordent souvent la priorité aux investissements directs étrangers par rapport aux activités économiques des petits agriculteurs et au secteur informel en général.

Malgré les initiatives de politique sur le plan national, régional, continental et international, nous avons noté la poursuite de la dégradation de l'environnement et la violation des droits humains des populations résidant dans les zones minières. La destruction de l'environnement et la violation des droits humains engendrées par les activités minières se manifestent sous diverses formes, y compris la pollution des eaux, la destruction des moyens de moyens de subsistance des hommes et des femmes, la dégradation des terres, l'interruption des relations foncières, l'éviction forcée, des compensations inadéquates, le chômage, les problèmes de santé publique, l'empiètement dans les zones protégées et le manque de développement dans les communautés touchées par l'exploitation minière.

Les régimes miniers actuels accordent trop de privilèges aux sociétés minières multinationales qui favorisent la fuite des capitaux hors du continent. Ces privilèges se présentent sous plusieurs formes, notamment l'accès et le contrôle illimités des ressources minières, les concessions fiscales, la faible participation de l'état aux capitaux des sociétés minières, des baux miniers couvrant de longues périodes, des contrats et des accords d'investissement bilatéraux déséquilibrés, des mécanismes volontaires reddition de compte. Cette situation est aggravée par le manque d'échange d'information et la faible capacité institutionnelle pour suivre et éviter l'évasion fiscale et l'abus de l'environnement et des droits humains.

5.0 Revendications /Recommandations

A la lumière de ce qui précède, les propositions suivantes sont faites pour assurer le succès de l'Agenda de réforme, la protection des économies contre les effets dévastateurs de la crise financière et la protection des droits environnementaux et communautaires:

La crise financière

· Nous soutenons les appels à la réforme et à la réglementation du système financier international;

· Etant donné que la crise financière a mis en relief la vulnérabilité des pays tributaires des produits de base miniers et autres, nous exigeons que le débat actuel sur la réforme et la réglementation du système financier international accorde une attention particulière aux effets de la spéculation sur les pays tributaires des ressources minières et des options de protection de ces économies.

· En vue de contribuer à un régime commercial équitable des produits de base, nous lacons un appel à des actions urgentes pour l'élaboration des cadres de production et de stabilisation des prix et de gestion des produits de base stratégiques de l'Afrique. Cette approche permettra d'améliorer la coopération politique et économique entre les pays producteurs de produits de base miniers.

· Par ailleurs, il faudra des actions à long, moyen et court terme en vue de la valorisation grâce au traitement et à la transformation des minerais.

L'Agenda continental de réforme des politiques

· Nous considérons l'initiative de réforme en cours dirigé par la Commission Economique des Nations Unies pour l'Afrique (CENUA) sous la directive de l'UA comme une affirmation de l'échec des régimes miniers en vigueur et une mesure audacieuse qui doit bénéficier de l'appui nécessaire pour pouvoir aboutir.

· Nous lançons un appel à l'élargissement de l'accès au processus de réforme afin de prendre en prendre en compte une variété de perspectives dans la mesure du possible.

· Nous exigeons la cohérence et l'harmonisation des initiatives en cours sur le continent en vue d'optimiser les avantages à court terme et à long terme de l'exploitation minière pour l'Afrique et ses populations. A cet égard, les cadres qui vont émerger des initiatives de politique en cours sur le continent doivent se focaliser sur le rôle de développement de l'exploitation minière, une convergence des objectifs sociaux, culturels, économiques, environnementaux et politiques, y compris la nécessité d'améliorer le développement humain, les connaissances et les technologies indigènes ainsi que l'équité des genres et des générations.

· Les processus de réforme, la cohérence et l'harmonisation doivent fournir l'occasion pour la proposition des options de politique qui vont au delà du rôle central des investissements étrangers directs en Afrique en général et dans le secteur minier en particulier.

Nous exigeons une action commune contre toute menace à la base philosophique et au succès d'une réforme qui offre des cadres qui protègent les intérêts communautaires et l'environnement et contribuent à la promotion du développement économique et de la culture de la citoyenneté dans le domaine de l'exploitation minière.

Nous réitérons nos revendications en faveur de:

· la fin à l'impunité et à la violation des droits communautaires et environnementaux. ;

· la révision des contrats miniers pour les rendre justes, transparents et équitables en vue d'optimiser leur contribution au développement national.

· l'augmentation des royalties et la participation de l'état aux capitaux propres des sociétés minières, surtout dans les cas du Niger, de la République Démocratique du Congo, de la Zambie, de la Sierra Leone et de la Guinée;

· l'introduction des taxes spécifiques telles que la taxe exceptionnelle sur les bénéfices et une taxe spéciale consacrée á la mise en œuvre de l'agenda de la réforme continental;

· la revue du cadre et l'administration de l'évaluation de l'impact environnemental et sociale pour prendre en compte les questions telles que les droits de l'homme, le genre, les habitats et l'accès aux moyens de subsistance.

· L'abrogation de les clauses de stabilité, de développement et de la confidentialité des rapports d'audit environnemental dans les codes nationaux car elles constituent de vrais obstacles à l'autonomie de l'Etat et l'accès du public à l'information.

· la transparence et la responsabilité des institutions publiques et des sociétés minières, particulièrement dans leurs relations avec les communautés et les groupes de citoyens et au niveau de leurs obligations dans les domaines de l'environnement, des droits humains et de la fiscalité.

6.0 Conclusion

Nous avons conclu cette réunion tout en ayant à l'esprit que l'initiative de réforme fera l'objet des contestations mais nous sommes plein d'espoir que les gouvernements et les leaders africains vont s'unir autour de la Vision Africaine sur l'exploitation minière et dans la poursuite de l'initiative de réforme de manière á répondre aux besoins et obligations des populations africaines et de leurs économies. Nous comptons également qu'ils vont contrecarrer dans ce même état d'esprit toute menace de déraillement ou de réorientation de la réforme au profit des sociétés multinationales et de quelques élites privilégiés.

Conscients de nos diverses capacités, nous, en tant membres de la société civile africaines en collaboration avec nos partenaires, nous sommes engagés á continuer á œuvrer ensemble pour la promotion et la protection des droits communautaires, de l'environnement et de la réalisation des aspirations des populations africaines. Nous lançons un appel à d'autres organisations, en particulier la communauté universitaires, les médias, les groupes de femmes, des militants des droits de l'homme à travers l'Afrique à s'associer à AIMES dans cet effort.

Souscrite par:

1. Mamadou GOÏTA
Directeur Exécutif IRPAD/Afrique
Mali

2. Abu A. Brima
Executive Director
Network Movement for Justice and Development (NMJD)

3. Alvin Mosioma
Coordinator
Tax Justice Network for Africa (TJN-A)

4. Mohammed S. Turay
Programme Officer
Network Movement for Justice and Development (NMJD)

5. Roger Moody
Mines and Communities

6. Wilson Kipsang Kipkazi
Secretary/Programmes Director
Endoris Welfare Council

7. Kabinet Cisse
Change de Programme Resource Naturelle
Guinea

7. Mamadou Diaby
Community Representative
Guinea

9. Idrisa Sako
Journalist, Les Echoes

10. Caroline Ntaopane
Mining Programme Officer
Bench Marks, Johannesburg, South Africa

11. Richard Adjei-Poku
Executive Director
Livelihood & Environment Ghana (LEG)

12. Jamie Kneen
Communications & Outreach Coordinator
Miningwatch, Canada

13. Jean-Luc Muke
Member, Avocats Verts Org
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

14. Joshua Klemm
Program Associate, Africa
Bank Information Center

15. Mawutor Samuel
Ghana

16. Abdulai Darimani
Third World Network - Africa

17. Lindlyn Tamufor
Ghana

18. Yao Graham
Coordinator
Third World Network - Africa

19. Barbara Zida Kpodo
Programme Officer
Third World Network - Africa

20. Gilbert Makore
Zimbabwe Environmental Law Association (ZELA)
Zimbabwe

21. Gertrude Frimpomaa Domfeh
Coalitions and Partnerships Officer
ABANTU for Development, Ghana

22. Kanni Abdoulaye
GREN Niger

23. Hamadataher Haroun Moussa
GREN Niger

24. Van Edig Christopu
Niger

25. Nouhoum Keita
Community representative, Mali

26. Prince Chima Williams
Environmental Rights Action/ OilWatch-Africa

27. Fatoumata Traore
Mali

28. Assetou Samake
Researcher, Mali

Home | About Us | Companies | Countries | Minerals | Contact Us
© Mines and Communities 2013. Web site by Zippy Info